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The patient's voice in neuro‐surgery: psycho‐socio‐economic benefits of a patient‐designed versus standard service following treatment for a subarachnoid haemorrhage

The patient's voice in neuro‐surgery: psycho‐socio‐economic benefits of a patient‐designed versus... Purpose – Successive governments have called for greater “empowerment” of the patient, reflected in the chief medical officer's call for more patient‐related outcome measures (PROM). This paper aims to bring together three‐linked studies. Design/methodology/approach – First study: in 1999, the neurosurgical patient was seen as “expert” to identify PROM outcomes, based upon a patient and carer‐designed self‐administered postal questionnaire in a regional two‐year retrospective survey of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) patients with a 77 per cent response rate, designated treatment‐as‐usual (TAU) cohort (n=142).Second study: in the same region, following the implementing of the specialist neuro‐vascular nurse (SNVN), the SNVN recommendation was evaluated in a two‐year prospective study (n=184) that provided family‐specific psychosocial support and a continuity of care linking hospital and community; the response rate was 87 per cent. Third study: A re‐analysis of the national SAH study (n=2,380), by projecting the TAU and SNVN results onto clinically matched patients within the National cohort to estimate the potential “savings” if all 34 neurosurgical units had an SNVN type service. Findings – First study: respondents identified many psychosocial and fiscal problems but recommended a SNVN to reduce these difficulties. Second study: the TAU and SNVN patient's were a close clinical match and using the TAU as a control group, it was found that there were major psychosocial and fiscal benefits for SNVN patients and carers, who more speedily re‐established their lives.Third study: it was estimated that this would have produced major financial benefits, e.g. 4,165 fewer bed occupancy days, saving £2.5million; reduced time‐off work for patients and carers, saving £8.1million; and, after deducting cost of a national SNVN service, a combined saving for the service and families of an estimated £9.83 million p.a. Thus, addressing PROM outcomes, through an integrated psychosocial service in neurosurgery was cost‐effective, benefited families, the service, and the wider economy and should be a factor when considering pressurised departmental budgets. Originality/value – Overall, what the two regional studies and the re‐analysis of the national study showed was that there are benefits from treating the “patient as expert” and taking on board their agendas. There is a need for a more integrated approach to treatment and care that is of value to the service, patients, families and the wider economy. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Care and Neurodisability Emerald Publishing

The patient's voice in neuro‐surgery: psycho‐socio‐economic benefits of a patient‐designed versus standard service following treatment for a subarachnoid haemorrhage

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
2042-0919
DOI
10.1108/20420911111142759
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – Successive governments have called for greater “empowerment” of the patient, reflected in the chief medical officer's call for more patient‐related outcome measures (PROM). This paper aims to bring together three‐linked studies. Design/methodology/approach – First study: in 1999, the neurosurgical patient was seen as “expert” to identify PROM outcomes, based upon a patient and carer‐designed self‐administered postal questionnaire in a regional two‐year retrospective survey of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) patients with a 77 per cent response rate, designated treatment‐as‐usual (TAU) cohort (n=142).Second study: in the same region, following the implementing of the specialist neuro‐vascular nurse (SNVN), the SNVN recommendation was evaluated in a two‐year prospective study (n=184) that provided family‐specific psychosocial support and a continuity of care linking hospital and community; the response rate was 87 per cent. Third study: A re‐analysis of the national SAH study (n=2,380), by projecting the TAU and SNVN results onto clinically matched patients within the National cohort to estimate the potential “savings” if all 34 neurosurgical units had an SNVN type service. Findings – First study: respondents identified many psychosocial and fiscal problems but recommended a SNVN to reduce these difficulties. Second study: the TAU and SNVN patient's were a close clinical match and using the TAU as a control group, it was found that there were major psychosocial and fiscal benefits for SNVN patients and carers, who more speedily re‐established their lives.Third study: it was estimated that this would have produced major financial benefits, e.g. 4,165 fewer bed occupancy days, saving £2.5million; reduced time‐off work for patients and carers, saving £8.1million; and, after deducting cost of a national SNVN service, a combined saving for the service and families of an estimated £9.83 million p.a. Thus, addressing PROM outcomes, through an integrated psychosocial service in neurosurgery was cost‐effective, benefited families, the service, and the wider economy and should be a factor when considering pressurised departmental budgets. Originality/value – Overall, what the two regional studies and the re‐analysis of the national study showed was that there are benefits from treating the “patient as expert” and taking on board their agendas. There is a need for a more integrated approach to treatment and care that is of value to the service, patients, families and the wider economy.

Journal

Social Care and NeurodisabilityEmerald Publishing

Published: May 23, 2011

Keywords: Patient care; Neurology; Medical treatment; Social economics

References