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The mirror trap

The mirror trap PurposeThis study aims to examine the influence of managerial perceptions on the strategic responses adopted by four Colombian organizations when facing a political crisis.Design/methodology/approachTo address this research, face‐to‐face interviews were conducted with Colombian managers, consultants, journalists, government officials, and industry experts, and triangulated with documents and archival data.FindingsThe findings show that the response adopted by each organization was significantly influenced by their manager's perception of the crisis and, consequently, was prone to producing a particular performance outcome.Practical implicationsThe authors’ findings constitute a strong warning call to managers and management teams about the possibility of falling into the “mirror trap”, through which their organizations will adopt strategic responses influenced by their own perceptions of crises.Originality/valueThese findings suggest that managers can affect performance through their individual assessment of a crisis as a threat, an opportunity, or neither one nor the other. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1012-8255
DOI
10.1108/ARLA-05-2013-0044
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThis study aims to examine the influence of managerial perceptions on the strategic responses adopted by four Colombian organizations when facing a political crisis.Design/methodology/approachTo address this research, face‐to‐face interviews were conducted with Colombian managers, consultants, journalists, government officials, and industry experts, and triangulated with documents and archival data.FindingsThe findings show that the response adopted by each organization was significantly influenced by their manager's perception of the crisis and, consequently, was prone to producing a particular performance outcome.Practical implicationsThe authors’ findings constitute a strong warning call to managers and management teams about the possibility of falling into the “mirror trap”, through which their organizations will adopt strategic responses influenced by their own perceptions of crises.Originality/valueThese findings suggest that managers can affect performance through their individual assessment of a crisis as a threat, an opportunity, or neither one nor the other.

Journal

Academia Revista Latinoamericana de AdministraciónEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 10, 2013

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