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The force of due regard: the disability equality duty and policy‐making in a time of cuts

The force of due regard: the disability equality duty and policy‐making in a time of cuts Purpose – This paper seeks to discuss the case‐law stemming from the disability equality duty under section 49A of the Disability Discrimination Act 1995, now reformulated as one part of the public sector equality duty under section 149 of the Equality Act 2010. Design/methodology/approach – The paper focuses in particular on the consequences of the case law for the development and implementation of policy relating to the provision of support for disabled people. Findings – Analysis of the relevant legal principles and individual cases reveals the high standards by which policy‐making will be tested in the courts and the serious consequences of defects in the decision‐making process. Practical implications – Policy‐makers and those acting on behalf of disabled people will need to pay extremely close attention to the requirements of the equality duty. Originality/value – The paper highlights the nature of the new public sector equality duty and its growing importance to public authorities and those affected by their decisions in the new financially straitened policy environment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Care and Neurodisability Emerald Publishing

The force of due regard: the disability equality duty and policy‐making in a time of cuts

Social Care and Neurodisability , Volume 2 (3): 8 – Aug 15, 2011

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
2042-0919
DOI
10.1108/20420911111172756
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This paper seeks to discuss the case‐law stemming from the disability equality duty under section 49A of the Disability Discrimination Act 1995, now reformulated as one part of the public sector equality duty under section 149 of the Equality Act 2010. Design/methodology/approach – The paper focuses in particular on the consequences of the case law for the development and implementation of policy relating to the provision of support for disabled people. Findings – Analysis of the relevant legal principles and individual cases reveals the high standards by which policy‐making will be tested in the courts and the serious consequences of defects in the decision‐making process. Practical implications – Policy‐makers and those acting on behalf of disabled people will need to pay extremely close attention to the requirements of the equality duty. Originality/value – The paper highlights the nature of the new public sector equality duty and its growing importance to public authorities and those affected by their decisions in the new financially straitened policy environment.

Journal

Social Care and NeurodisabilityEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 15, 2011

Keywords: Public sector equality duty; Disability equality duty; Adult social care; Public policy; Equality

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