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Suggestions for improving outcomes in the NHS following “mild” traumatic brain injury in adults, a bio‐psycho‐social approach

Suggestions for improving outcomes in the NHS following “mild” traumatic brain injury in adults,... Purpose – Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a common occurrence. For most people recovery is quick and complete. For a minority disability persists. This paper aims to discuss the factors that likely give rise to this on‐going disability and discuss the current evidence‐based approaches to treatment. Design/methodology/approach – A selective review of the contemporaneous research literature was undertaken. Findings – On‐going disability following mTBI is likely to be secondary to a combination of factors, namely subtle organic damage, psychological factors and situational/motivational factors. These factors likely operate to different degrees in different individuals and may vary over time in individual cases. Treatment in the form of a multi‐disciplinary assessment, accurate sign‐posting to appropriate services and cognitive‐behavioural psychotherapy is likely to improve outcomes for some with on‐going disability following mTBI. Research limitations/implications – Future research should aim to identify at an early stage post‐injury those individuals at risk of developing on‐going disability following mTBI and the efficacy of different treatment approaches. Practical implications – Earlier identification of individuals not making the expected rapid recovery from mTBI, followed by appropriate multi‐disciplinary assessment and intervention would likely improve outcomes for patients at risk of developing on‐going disability following mTBI. Originality/value – This paper is of value to healthcare professionals who encounter individuals reporting on‐going symptoms and problems following an apparently mild traumatic brain injury. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Care and Neurodisability Emerald Publishing

Suggestions for improving outcomes in the NHS following “mild” traumatic brain injury in adults, a bio‐psycho‐social approach

Social Care and Neurodisability , Volume 4 (2): 7 – May 10, 2013

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
2042-0919
DOI
10.1108/SCN-03-2013-0010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a common occurrence. For most people recovery is quick and complete. For a minority disability persists. This paper aims to discuss the factors that likely give rise to this on‐going disability and discuss the current evidence‐based approaches to treatment. Design/methodology/approach – A selective review of the contemporaneous research literature was undertaken. Findings – On‐going disability following mTBI is likely to be secondary to a combination of factors, namely subtle organic damage, psychological factors and situational/motivational factors. These factors likely operate to different degrees in different individuals and may vary over time in individual cases. Treatment in the form of a multi‐disciplinary assessment, accurate sign‐posting to appropriate services and cognitive‐behavioural psychotherapy is likely to improve outcomes for some with on‐going disability following mTBI. Research limitations/implications – Future research should aim to identify at an early stage post‐injury those individuals at risk of developing on‐going disability following mTBI and the efficacy of different treatment approaches. Practical implications – Earlier identification of individuals not making the expected rapid recovery from mTBI, followed by appropriate multi‐disciplinary assessment and intervention would likely improve outcomes for patients at risk of developing on‐going disability following mTBI. Originality/value – This paper is of value to healthcare professionals who encounter individuals reporting on‐going symptoms and problems following an apparently mild traumatic brain injury.

Journal

Social Care and NeurodisabilityEmerald Publishing

Published: May 10, 2013

Keywords: Mild traumatic brain injury; Management; Treatment; Brain; Injuries; Medical treatment

References