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Reflections on the internal auditing profession: what might have gone wrong?

Reflections on the internal auditing profession: what might have gone wrong? Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate and discuss potential reasons why the internal auditing (IA) profession has been marginalized in the governance debate on solutions after the financial crisis that started in 2007, also noting recent studies questioning the value of IA's work. The key aim of this paper is to make readers aware of ambiguities concerning the ultimate customer of IA and its core business, and to stimulate critical reflection thereon. Design/methodology/approach – The conceptual discussion of this paper is based on an objective review of relevant literature, both practitioner and academic. Findings – Positioning IA as agent to the board/audit committee and, at the same time, as partner to management is challenging in practice. The IA function should clarify the customer dimension in its organizational context. Furthermore, this paper argues for a consolidation of internal audit around its core function of providing assurance when seeking to establish IA as a profession. Practical implications – Practitioners will benefit as this paper demands fundamental questions to be addressed in the organizational context, about the ultimate customer and the core business of the IA service rendered. The Institute of Internal Auditors will benefit from this paper and subsequent discussions in academia and practice, supporting its pursuit to gain universal recognition for IA as a profession. Originality/value – This paper may open a new research area in IA that addresses a more critical way of evaluating IA practices. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Managerial Auditing Journal Emerald Publishing

Reflections on the internal auditing profession: what might have gone wrong?

Managerial Auditing Journal , Volume 27 (6): 18 – Jun 22, 2012

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References (78)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0268-6902
DOI
10.1108/02686901211236382
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate and discuss potential reasons why the internal auditing (IA) profession has been marginalized in the governance debate on solutions after the financial crisis that started in 2007, also noting recent studies questioning the value of IA's work. The key aim of this paper is to make readers aware of ambiguities concerning the ultimate customer of IA and its core business, and to stimulate critical reflection thereon. Design/methodology/approach – The conceptual discussion of this paper is based on an objective review of relevant literature, both practitioner and academic. Findings – Positioning IA as agent to the board/audit committee and, at the same time, as partner to management is challenging in practice. The IA function should clarify the customer dimension in its organizational context. Furthermore, this paper argues for a consolidation of internal audit around its core function of providing assurance when seeking to establish IA as a profession. Practical implications – Practitioners will benefit as this paper demands fundamental questions to be addressed in the organizational context, about the ultimate customer and the core business of the IA service rendered. The Institute of Internal Auditors will benefit from this paper and subsequent discussions in academia and practice, supporting its pursuit to gain universal recognition for IA as a profession. Originality/value – This paper may open a new research area in IA that addresses a more critical way of evaluating IA practices.

Journal

Managerial Auditing JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 22, 2012

Keywords: Internal auditing; Corporate governance; Professions

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