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Performance of open government data in a developing economy: a multi-stakeholder case analysis of Ghana

Performance of open government data in a developing economy: a multi-stakeholder case analysis of... This study uses the technology fit–viability theory to study the performance of one of the early pioneers of open government data (OGD) in Africa. The study aims to investigate the task and technology fit, as well as the economic, IT infrastructure and organisational viability as performance measures for the Ghana Open Government Data (GOGD) initiative.Design/methodology/approachThe study adopted a qualitative approach by interviewing key actors within the GOGD ecosystem, namely, the OGD implementing body, data suppliers and data users. The results were compared with established OGD best practices and standards around the world.FindingsThe results suggest that Ghana’s OGD architecture appears far from meeting its fit and viability goals because of lacklustre performance attributed to the following factors: a complete lack of synergy among various stakeholder groups and actors in the GOGD ecosystem, a lack of sustainable financial support for the implementing body, a shortage of qualified staff for the GOGD project and partial neglect of GOGD as a consequence of the implementation of a new project called eTransform.Research limitations/implicationsThis research is limited to Ghana’s OGD initiative. Perhaps, a comparative study on the performance of other OGD initiatives in Africa and other developed countries will present another view of how OGD initiatives are performing across the globe. Again, the number of interviewees in the study may not be sufficient to generalise the results.Practical implicationsThe study guides developing economies on how to examine national and international legal frameworks that have consequences on the usage of OGD at the national and sub-national levels. Besides, the study results will help implementing agencies and by extension government to be wary of the consequences of neglecting relevant stakeholders in the implementation process. The study also emphasizes on the need for developing economies to have sustainable funding and technical support for OGD implementation.Social implicationsThe study helps shape citizens’ understanding of what the government is doing pursuant to making data readily available for them. Because OGD spurs innovations, citizens’ continuous involvement is key in the process of realising government drive to be open and accountable to citizens through data.Originality/valueThis research is the first, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, to present a retrospective and prospective view of a country’s OGD implementation to ascertain the country’s fit and viability. More uniquely, this study will be the first, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, in assessing the performance of OGD setup in Africa. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy Emerald Publishing

Performance of open government data in a developing economy: a multi-stakeholder case analysis of Ghana

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
1750-6166
eISSN
1750-6166
DOI
10.1108/tg-10-2021-0158
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study uses the technology fit–viability theory to study the performance of one of the early pioneers of open government data (OGD) in Africa. The study aims to investigate the task and technology fit, as well as the economic, IT infrastructure and organisational viability as performance measures for the Ghana Open Government Data (GOGD) initiative.Design/methodology/approachThe study adopted a qualitative approach by interviewing key actors within the GOGD ecosystem, namely, the OGD implementing body, data suppliers and data users. The results were compared with established OGD best practices and standards around the world.FindingsThe results suggest that Ghana’s OGD architecture appears far from meeting its fit and viability goals because of lacklustre performance attributed to the following factors: a complete lack of synergy among various stakeholder groups and actors in the GOGD ecosystem, a lack of sustainable financial support for the implementing body, a shortage of qualified staff for the GOGD project and partial neglect of GOGD as a consequence of the implementation of a new project called eTransform.Research limitations/implicationsThis research is limited to Ghana’s OGD initiative. Perhaps, a comparative study on the performance of other OGD initiatives in Africa and other developed countries will present another view of how OGD initiatives are performing across the globe. Again, the number of interviewees in the study may not be sufficient to generalise the results.Practical implicationsThe study guides developing economies on how to examine national and international legal frameworks that have consequences on the usage of OGD at the national and sub-national levels. Besides, the study results will help implementing agencies and by extension government to be wary of the consequences of neglecting relevant stakeholders in the implementation process. The study also emphasizes on the need for developing economies to have sustainable funding and technical support for OGD implementation.Social implicationsThe study helps shape citizens’ understanding of what the government is doing pursuant to making data readily available for them. Because OGD spurs innovations, citizens’ continuous involvement is key in the process of realising government drive to be open and accountable to citizens through data.Originality/valueThis research is the first, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, to present a retrospective and prospective view of a country’s OGD implementation to ascertain the country’s fit and viability. More uniquely, this study will be the first, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, in assessing the performance of OGD setup in Africa.

Journal

Transforming Government: People, Process and PolicyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 12, 2022

Keywords: Open government data (OGD); Developing economy; Fit–viability theory; Multi-stakeholder analysis; Open government partnership (OGP)

References