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One study, four cities: information impact in neighborhood economic development

One study, four cities: information impact in neighborhood economic development The purpose of this study is to create a theory on how a commissioned study impacts the decision-making of local government officials.Design/methodology/approachThis study uses comparative case studies via the “Knowledge Cycle,” which is a method of examining information use for four distinct decision-making environments’ development (Baltimore, Maryland; Louisville, Kentucky; Detroit, Michigan; and Tampa, Florida).FindingsThis study reports significance in three factors that may explain information impact: the presence of an “information champion” who directs the application of the study toward initiatives that are important to them, the length of time that one can use information before it becomes outdated and the ability to use the study to spur dialogue with development stakeholders outside of local government.Research limitations/implicationsThe limitation to this study is that it is limited to the observation of a specific population (local government economic development bureaucrats) and their use of a specific package of information. The debate is open to whether the findings of this study are relevant to actors using other types of information within other levels of government and within other fields of inquiry.Practical implicationsAdvances in information technology and the proliferation of data intermediaries who can use sophisticated analysis warrant the understanding how government officials interact with the studies that they commission.Originality/valueTo date, there are few studies that have examined how a singular package of information is used in multiple decision-making environments. This paper adds to this dearth of scholarship while creating theory to how and why local decision-makers may use information. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy Emerald Publishing

One study, four cities: information impact in neighborhood economic development

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
1750-6166
eISSN
1750-6166
DOI
10.1108/tg-07-2019-0070
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to create a theory on how a commissioned study impacts the decision-making of local government officials.Design/methodology/approachThis study uses comparative case studies via the “Knowledge Cycle,” which is a method of examining information use for four distinct decision-making environments’ development (Baltimore, Maryland; Louisville, Kentucky; Detroit, Michigan; and Tampa, Florida).FindingsThis study reports significance in three factors that may explain information impact: the presence of an “information champion” who directs the application of the study toward initiatives that are important to them, the length of time that one can use information before it becomes outdated and the ability to use the study to spur dialogue with development stakeholders outside of local government.Research limitations/implicationsThe limitation to this study is that it is limited to the observation of a specific population (local government economic development bureaucrats) and their use of a specific package of information. The debate is open to whether the findings of this study are relevant to actors using other types of information within other levels of government and within other fields of inquiry.Practical implicationsAdvances in information technology and the proliferation of data intermediaries who can use sophisticated analysis warrant the understanding how government officials interact with the studies that they commission.Originality/valueTo date, there are few studies that have examined how a singular package of information is used in multiple decision-making environments. This paper adds to this dearth of scholarship while creating theory to how and why local decision-makers may use information.

Journal

Transforming Government: People, Process and PolicyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 3, 2020

Keywords: Local government; Knowledge cycle; Information impact; Information utilization; Neighborhood economic development; Knowledge

References