Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Investigating EAI adoption in the local government authorities A case of mapping the influential factors on the adoption lifecycle phases

Investigating EAI adoption in the local government authorities A case of mapping the influential... Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore and validate the adoption lifecycle phases and perform the mapping of factors influencing the decision making process for enterprise application integration (EAI) adoption on the adoption lifecycle phases in two local government authorities (LGAs). Design/methodology/approach – A case study based research approach using interviews with the decision makers is utilised to investigate the less acknowledged phenomena like EAI adoption. This approach assists in examining the phenomenon in its natural setting, examining the in‐depth complexities and processes, and providing considerable flexibility during interviews and observations. Findings – According to the empirical findings, the factors influencing EAI adoption and the adoption lifecycle phases are appropriate for studying the research context. The analysis and study of the factors and adoption lifecycle phases is made carefully and specifically to fit and be compatible within the context of LGAs. As a result, it is apparent from the empirical findings that most of the factors influence the decision making process for EAI adoption on each phase of the adoption lifecycle in the case organisations with exception to few factors. Research limitations/implications – The combination of theoretical discussions, analysis of the literature and empirical research presented in this paper illustrates the start of research on EAI adoption in LGAs. However, the theoretical and empirical data collected are confined to the limited context of two LGAs within the region of England. The structure of LGAs varies in different parts of the UK. In the light of the reflections and the research limitations of this paper it is recommended that further work could usefully be pursed to validate the adoption lifecycle phases and perform the mapping of the factors at each phase of the adoption lifecycle in the context of other types of LGAs, different cities and countries. Originality/value – From a conceptual and empirical point of view, none of the existing EAI adoption studies investigated the mapping of the factors influencing EAI adoption on the adoption lifecycle phases. In doing so, the authors consider this as a literature void and report that it is important to understand and manage the EAI adoption process in LGAs. The mapping of factors process is substantial as it may enhance the analysis of EAI adoption process in LGAs and further facilitate the decision makers in realising the importance of EAI adoption factors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy Emerald Publishing

Investigating EAI adoption in the local government authorities A case of mapping the influential factors on the adoption lifecycle phases

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/investigating-eai-adoption-in-the-local-government-authorities-a-case-8SloGNngUi
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1750-6166
DOI
10.1108/17506160910960577
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore and validate the adoption lifecycle phases and perform the mapping of factors influencing the decision making process for enterprise application integration (EAI) adoption on the adoption lifecycle phases in two local government authorities (LGAs). Design/methodology/approach – A case study based research approach using interviews with the decision makers is utilised to investigate the less acknowledged phenomena like EAI adoption. This approach assists in examining the phenomenon in its natural setting, examining the in‐depth complexities and processes, and providing considerable flexibility during interviews and observations. Findings – According to the empirical findings, the factors influencing EAI adoption and the adoption lifecycle phases are appropriate for studying the research context. The analysis and study of the factors and adoption lifecycle phases is made carefully and specifically to fit and be compatible within the context of LGAs. As a result, it is apparent from the empirical findings that most of the factors influence the decision making process for EAI adoption on each phase of the adoption lifecycle in the case organisations with exception to few factors. Research limitations/implications – The combination of theoretical discussions, analysis of the literature and empirical research presented in this paper illustrates the start of research on EAI adoption in LGAs. However, the theoretical and empirical data collected are confined to the limited context of two LGAs within the region of England. The structure of LGAs varies in different parts of the UK. In the light of the reflections and the research limitations of this paper it is recommended that further work could usefully be pursed to validate the adoption lifecycle phases and perform the mapping of the factors at each phase of the adoption lifecycle in the context of other types of LGAs, different cities and countries. Originality/value – From a conceptual and empirical point of view, none of the existing EAI adoption studies investigated the mapping of the factors influencing EAI adoption on the adoption lifecycle phases. In doing so, the authors consider this as a literature void and report that it is important to understand and manage the EAI adoption process in LGAs. The mapping of factors process is substantial as it may enhance the analysis of EAI adoption process in LGAs and further facilitate the decision makers in realising the importance of EAI adoption factors.

Journal

Transforming Government: People, Process and PolicyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 29, 2009

Keywords: Local government; Information systems

References