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Information systems for higher education: interactive design perspective

Information systems for higher education: interactive design perspective Purpose – This paper aims to highlight some learning and teaching challenges in relation to universities and colleges in the Gulf region, including students' learning preferences, and cultural aspects. It explores the sequential‐global learning styles profile of undergraduate students as part of a continuous research in Information Systems Design with a particular focus on the design of Interactive Learning Systems (ILS). Design/methodology/approach – The paper examines the learning style profile of undergraduate students for a cohort of Management Information Systems at a regional university in the UAE. It uses the Index of learning styles instrument as a tool for measuring the sequential‐global learning styles dimension. Also, the paper conducts a literature review of different aspects related to current challenges facing undergraduate students in the Gulf region as well as design principles related to the interactivity of learning systems. Findings – The results show overall equal tendency towards both the sequential and global styles, different from a previous paper conducted in UK university. The paper highlights some students' differences that should be catered for in ILS design. Originality/value – The paper is expected to provide further insights into some of the challenges facing many students doing their undergraduate degrees as well as the importance of a carefully balanced design of ILS (balance and bend model) to cater for students' different preferences and needs. A discussion and recommendations on how these findings can be reflected on the design of ILS are provided. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy Emerald Publishing

Information systems for higher education: interactive design perspective

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1750-6166
DOI
10.1108/17506160910960559
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This paper aims to highlight some learning and teaching challenges in relation to universities and colleges in the Gulf region, including students' learning preferences, and cultural aspects. It explores the sequential‐global learning styles profile of undergraduate students as part of a continuous research in Information Systems Design with a particular focus on the design of Interactive Learning Systems (ILS). Design/methodology/approach – The paper examines the learning style profile of undergraduate students for a cohort of Management Information Systems at a regional university in the UAE. It uses the Index of learning styles instrument as a tool for measuring the sequential‐global learning styles dimension. Also, the paper conducts a literature review of different aspects related to current challenges facing undergraduate students in the Gulf region as well as design principles related to the interactivity of learning systems. Findings – The results show overall equal tendency towards both the sequential and global styles, different from a previous paper conducted in UK university. The paper highlights some students' differences that should be catered for in ILS design. Originality/value – The paper is expected to provide further insights into some of the challenges facing many students doing their undergraduate degrees as well as the importance of a carefully balanced design of ILS (balance and bend model) to cater for students' different preferences and needs. A discussion and recommendations on how these findings can be reflected on the design of ILS are provided.

Journal

Transforming Government: People, Process and PolicyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 29, 2009

Keywords: Interactive devices; Learning styles

References