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How can children with ABI achieve their potential?

How can children with ABI achieve their potential? Purpose – Functional deficits caused by ABI often prevent children from developing independence at the level of which they are cognitively capable. This case study aims to illustrate how consistent educational and behaviour management strategies including an antecedent behaviour management (ABM) approach, coupled with individualised neuroeducation informed by the student's specific neurodisabilities, had a positive impact on attainment and development and led to much improved ability to self manage, interact with others and attain personal goals. Design/methodology/approach – The study considers the impact of an antecedent behaviour management (ABM) approach, coupled with individualised neuroeducation, in working with an adolescent student whose violent, aggressive and self‐harming behaviour was preventing her from developing independence, achieving her academic potential and interacting positively with her family, peers and other adults. Findings – The results of the case study indicate that a consistent and well‐informed ABM strategy can have an extremely positive effect, when employed in conjunction with individualised neuroeducation, resulting in improved self‐management, independence, academic attainment and a much improved relationship with peers, family and other adults. Originality/value – The Trust Centre is the UK's only specialist school for children with an ABI and this is the first time in the UK that a 24‐hour curriculum, encompassing therapy, care and academic education, has been integrated based on the child's identified neurological needs. The findings clearly point to the value of this approach. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Care and Neurodisability Emerald Publishing

How can children with ABI achieve their potential?

Social Care and Neurodisability , Volume 4 (2): 6 – May 10, 2013

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
2042-0919
DOI
10.1108/SCN-03-2013-0011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – Functional deficits caused by ABI often prevent children from developing independence at the level of which they are cognitively capable. This case study aims to illustrate how consistent educational and behaviour management strategies including an antecedent behaviour management (ABM) approach, coupled with individualised neuroeducation informed by the student's specific neurodisabilities, had a positive impact on attainment and development and led to much improved ability to self manage, interact with others and attain personal goals. Design/methodology/approach – The study considers the impact of an antecedent behaviour management (ABM) approach, coupled with individualised neuroeducation, in working with an adolescent student whose violent, aggressive and self‐harming behaviour was preventing her from developing independence, achieving her academic potential and interacting positively with her family, peers and other adults. Findings – The results of the case study indicate that a consistent and well‐informed ABM strategy can have an extremely positive effect, when employed in conjunction with individualised neuroeducation, resulting in improved self‐management, independence, academic attainment and a much improved relationship with peers, family and other adults. Originality/value – The Trust Centre is the UK's only specialist school for children with an ABI and this is the first time in the UK that a 24‐hour curriculum, encompassing therapy, care and academic education, has been integrated based on the child's identified neurological needs. The findings clearly point to the value of this approach.

Journal

Social Care and NeurodisabilityEmerald Publishing

Published: May 10, 2013

Keywords: Acquired brain injury; Paediatrics; Behaviour; Antecedent; Neurological; Achievement

References