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Guest editorial

Guest editorial E-democracy and the European Union: input and output legitimacy through information and communication technology The European Union (EU) is at present one of the political entities in the world that has fully recognised the vital role of information and communication technology (ICT) for politics, the public space, economy and welfare. At the same time, the EU is repeatedly accused of carrying a major democratic deficit vis-à-vis its citizens. To address this issue, the EU has in the past often made choices that concentrate on output legitimacy, i.e. policy results, rather than substantially fostering input legitimacy, in the form of citizens’ participation and public debate. The Lisbon Treaty introduces ways of addressing these issues, yet, much more needs to be done to pre-empt the criticisms. In reckoning the importance of the digital age and, thus, fostering policies for adapting to it and adopting it, the EU and its member- states may be again playing on the side of policy outputs. At the same time, however, substantial opportunities on the policy inputs exist too. The bid to democratise the EU is also a multilevel challenge as it includes both the EU institutions directly as well as the EU member-states and the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
1750-6166
eISSN
1750-6166
DOI
10.1108/tg-08-2021-316
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

E-democracy and the European Union: input and output legitimacy through information and communication technology The European Union (EU) is at present one of the political entities in the world that has fully recognised the vital role of information and communication technology (ICT) for politics, the public space, economy and welfare. At the same time, the EU is repeatedly accused of carrying a major democratic deficit vis-à-vis its citizens. To address this issue, the EU has in the past often made choices that concentrate on output legitimacy, i.e. policy results, rather than substantially fostering input legitimacy, in the form of citizens’ participation and public debate. The Lisbon Treaty introduces ways of addressing these issues, yet, much more needs to be done to pre-empt the criticisms. In reckoning the importance of the digital age and, thus, fostering policies for adapting to it and adopting it, the EU and its member- states may be again playing on the side of policy outputs. At the same time, however, substantial opportunities on the policy inputs exist too. The bid to democratise the EU is also a multilevel challenge as it includes both the EU institutions directly as well as the EU member-states and the

Journal

Transforming Government: People, Process and PolicyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 14, 2021

References