Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Guest editorial

Guest editorial JARHE 9,1 Reviewing the performance and impact of social media tools in higher education The adoption of social media tools within higher education has become steadily prevalent being applied towards the delivery of a variety of academic disciplines (Wang and Meiselwitz, 2015). Prior research has also indicated that social media use, dependent on its implementation, can support and facilitate various pedagogical approaches towards course provision (Cooke, 2015). Learning in higher education has become ubiquitous with cell phones, personal data assistants (PDAs) and smart phones used to deliver educational content (Pimmer et al., 2016). However, despite the apparent increase of its use, research has indicated that academic opinion is slightly divided on this matter. For example, it has been argued that within higher education, social media tools can aid students in collaboration and sharing information and knowledge (Sobaih et al., 2016). In contrast, there appears to be an inability for students to acknowledge social media as a formal educational tool (Greenhow and Lewin, 2016). Furthermore, it has also been stated that the use of social media for adoption in higher education for teaching and learning purposes is not as widespread in comparison to its personal or individual use (Manca and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education Emerald Publishing

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/guest-editorial-ktJ1v6dIfm
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2050-7003
DOI
10.1108/JARHE-10-2016-0069
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JARHE 9,1 Reviewing the performance and impact of social media tools in higher education The adoption of social media tools within higher education has become steadily prevalent being applied towards the delivery of a variety of academic disciplines (Wang and Meiselwitz, 2015). Prior research has also indicated that social media use, dependent on its implementation, can support and facilitate various pedagogical approaches towards course provision (Cooke, 2015). Learning in higher education has become ubiquitous with cell phones, personal data assistants (PDAs) and smart phones used to deliver educational content (Pimmer et al., 2016). However, despite the apparent increase of its use, research has indicated that academic opinion is slightly divided on this matter. For example, it has been argued that within higher education, social media tools can aid students in collaboration and sharing information and knowledge (Sobaih et al., 2016). In contrast, there appears to be an inability for students to acknowledge social media as a formal educational tool (Greenhow and Lewin, 2016). Furthermore, it has also been stated that the use of social media for adoption in higher education for teaching and learning purposes is not as widespread in comparison to its personal or individual use (Manca and

Journal

Journal of Applied Research in Higher EducationEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 6, 2017

References