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Global e-government development: besides the relative wealth of countries, do policies matter?

Global e-government development: besides the relative wealth of countries, do policies matter? This study aims to investigate whether, discounting the effect of the relative wealth of countries, it is possible to observe the relevance of policies for e-government development.Design/methodology/approachThe deviations of countries' results from what could be expected, considering their relative wealth is calculated by using the residuals of a linear regression using the Gross Domestic Product per capita as the independent variable and the UN E-Government Development Index as the dependent variable. The countries that achieve better and worse results than expected are then identified and their cases are analyzed by resorting to secondary sources, namely, published research referring to their cases. Those research documents were identified by successively searching the Scopus database, the Google Scholar database and the Web of Science.FindingsThe existence of formal e-government strategies and plans and the capacity to implement them can make a difference, allowing countries to achieve better results than expected or, in their absence, to perform worse than expected.Research limitations/implicationsThe proposed methodology can be useful to e-government researchers, particularly as a basis for deeper and more detailed studies.Practical implicationsCountries should invest in well-developed and focused strategies and continuity of public policies and their capacity to deliver results. For that purpose, political commitment and high-level coordination are key factors. For low-income countries, long-lasting cooperation with external experienced partners is crucial. For high-income countries, innovative thinking is a key enabler.Originality/valueThis study uses an innovative method to look beyond the effect of the relative wealth of countries and investigate the relevance of public policies for e-government development. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy Emerald Publishing

Global e-government development: besides the relative wealth of countries, do policies matter?

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
1750-6166
DOI
10.1108/tg-12-2019-0125
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study aims to investigate whether, discounting the effect of the relative wealth of countries, it is possible to observe the relevance of policies for e-government development.Design/methodology/approachThe deviations of countries' results from what could be expected, considering their relative wealth is calculated by using the residuals of a linear regression using the Gross Domestic Product per capita as the independent variable and the UN E-Government Development Index as the dependent variable. The countries that achieve better and worse results than expected are then identified and their cases are analyzed by resorting to secondary sources, namely, published research referring to their cases. Those research documents were identified by successively searching the Scopus database, the Google Scholar database and the Web of Science.FindingsThe existence of formal e-government strategies and plans and the capacity to implement them can make a difference, allowing countries to achieve better results than expected or, in their absence, to perform worse than expected.Research limitations/implicationsThe proposed methodology can be useful to e-government researchers, particularly as a basis for deeper and more detailed studies.Practical implicationsCountries should invest in well-developed and focused strategies and continuity of public policies and their capacity to deliver results. For that purpose, political commitment and high-level coordination are key factors. For low-income countries, long-lasting cooperation with external experienced partners is crucial. For high-income countries, innovative thinking is a key enabler.Originality/valueThis study uses an innovative method to look beyond the effect of the relative wealth of countries and investigate the relevance of public policies for e-government development.

Journal

Transforming Government: People, Process and PolicyEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 28, 2020

Keywords: E-government; E-participation; Benchmarking; Developing countries; United Nations; EGDI

References