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Evolution of an IS development effort An ANT interpretation

Evolution of an IS development effort An ANT interpretation Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to stand back from the debate of success and failure and develop an interpretive account based on narratives of major actors to enable project managers with a rich understanding of a complex organisation. Design/methodology/approach – Actor network theory (ANT) was the method that was applied to both frame and sum narratives that were gathered from the six subjects along with anecdotal evidence and confidential documents used for this research. Findings – Success is based on the perception of both actors as well as the principal audience of the Commonwealth Games (CWG). Second information systems (IS) success is uniquely associated to an event like the CWG. Research limitations/implications – Most of the data used for the research was after the conclusion of the games. Therefore usefulness of interpretation may have a time dimension. Probably if the subjects had included spectators and other project managers during the games, the quality of conclusions could have been further enriched. Practical implications – Project managers of future events may be able to internalise the role of co‐ordination and agreement that is necessary among different actors to achieve success. Originality/value – Originality of present paper stems from its “unusual” identification of success – as it has attempted to outline distinctions between certainty of success and anything contrary to success. Project managers, organisers and researchers of IS projects are likely to find value in the paper in being able to appreciate the evolutionary nature of IS success. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Systems and Information Technology Emerald Publishing

Evolution of an IS development effort An ANT interpretation

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1328-7265
DOI
10.1108/13287260910955110
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to stand back from the debate of success and failure and develop an interpretive account based on narratives of major actors to enable project managers with a rich understanding of a complex organisation. Design/methodology/approach – Actor network theory (ANT) was the method that was applied to both frame and sum narratives that were gathered from the six subjects along with anecdotal evidence and confidential documents used for this research. Findings – Success is based on the perception of both actors as well as the principal audience of the Commonwealth Games (CWG). Second information systems (IS) success is uniquely associated to an event like the CWG. Research limitations/implications – Most of the data used for the research was after the conclusion of the games. Therefore usefulness of interpretation may have a time dimension. Probably if the subjects had included spectators and other project managers during the games, the quality of conclusions could have been further enriched. Practical implications – Project managers of future events may be able to internalise the role of co‐ordination and agreement that is necessary among different actors to achieve success. Originality/value – Originality of present paper stems from its “unusual” identification of success – as it has attempted to outline distinctions between certainty of success and anything contrary to success. Project managers, organisers and researchers of IS projects are likely to find value in the paper in being able to appreciate the evolutionary nature of IS success.

Journal

Journal of Systems and Information TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 2009

Keywords: Information systems; Narratives; Project management; Operations management

References