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Enhancing the curriculum: shareable multimedia learning objects

Enhancing the curriculum: shareable multimedia learning objects Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to report on an action research initiative designed to facilitate the creation of shareable multimedia learning objects at a UK higher education institution. The use of multimedia learning objects in educational settings has been the subject of much interest in recent years. However, it has been suggested that a significant barrier to the uptake and use of these resources has been the lack of technical ability and support available to teachers. The Faculty of Health at Birmingham City University (BCU) was committed to the use of learning objects in the university's learning environment. However, creating innovative and exciting resources had been out of the reach of most lecturing staff due to time, financial and technical barriers. The Centre for Enhancing Learning and Teaching (CELT) at BCU collaborated with the Department of Community Health and Social Work in the Faculty of Health to produce a number of shareable learning objects to be used for enquiry‐based learning. Design/methodology/approach – The paper begins by discussing some theoretical background and existing studies before going on to outline the collaboration and the pedagogy that inspired the creation of the learning objects and the processes involved in creating the resources. Findings – The paper discusses some preliminary research results and plans for future development. Originality/value – The objective of this initiative was to explore ways in which we could overcome barriers to the creation of pedagogically sound learning objects. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Systems and Information Technology Emerald Publishing

Enhancing the curriculum: shareable multimedia learning objects

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1328-7265
DOI
10.1108/13287260910932421
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to report on an action research initiative designed to facilitate the creation of shareable multimedia learning objects at a UK higher education institution. The use of multimedia learning objects in educational settings has been the subject of much interest in recent years. However, it has been suggested that a significant barrier to the uptake and use of these resources has been the lack of technical ability and support available to teachers. The Faculty of Health at Birmingham City University (BCU) was committed to the use of learning objects in the university's learning environment. However, creating innovative and exciting resources had been out of the reach of most lecturing staff due to time, financial and technical barriers. The Centre for Enhancing Learning and Teaching (CELT) at BCU collaborated with the Department of Community Health and Social Work in the Faculty of Health to produce a number of shareable learning objects to be used for enquiry‐based learning. Design/methodology/approach – The paper begins by discussing some theoretical background and existing studies before going on to outline the collaboration and the pedagogy that inspired the creation of the learning objects and the processes involved in creating the resources. Findings – The paper discusses some preliminary research results and plans for future development. Originality/value – The objective of this initiative was to explore ways in which we could overcome barriers to the creation of pedagogically sound learning objects.

Journal

Journal of Systems and Information TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 30, 2009

Keywords: Learning methods; Multimedia; Curriculum development; United Kingdom

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