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Black Americans report greater resilience to suicide unless its interpersonally motivated and are more accepting of others right to die

Black Americans report greater resilience to suicide unless its interpersonally motivated and are... Suicide is a public health crisis that differentially affects racial and ethnic groups. Suicide is a public health crisis that differentially affects racial and ethnic groups. American Indians had the highest per capita suicide rates (11.1 for females and 33.4 for males) followed by White Americans (8.0 for females and 29.8 for males; Centers for Disease Control, 2019). There is an emerging focus on racial/ethnic disparities in suicide prevention research. Prior studies suggest that more accepting attitudes toward suicide are associated with elevated suicide risk status. As such, this study aims to examine the association between racial/ethnic identity and three attitude domains: the right to die, interpersonal gestures and resilience.Design/methodology/approachGeneral linear models were used to compare racial/ethnic groups in right to die, interpersonal gestures and resilience attitudes.FindingsParticipants who identified as Native American or Black were more likely than participants who identified as White, Bi/Multi-racial and Hispanic to hold attitudes supporting interpersonal motivations for suicide. Participants who identified as Black were more likely than participants who identified as White to hold right to die attitudes. Participants who identified as Black were more likely than White participants to report not viewing suicide as an option. These results suggest that racial/ethnic identity impacts attitudes toward suicide. People who identify as Native American or Black may be more likely to see suicide as acceptable for interpersonal reasons despite those who identify as Black being less likely to see suicide as an option. This study has implications for suicide prevention programs and interventions within racial/ethnic communities. Focusing interventions on attitudes supporting interpersonal motivations for suicide may increase effectiveness within Native American and Black communities.Originality/valueThis study aimed to fill a gap in suicide prevention research by examining associations between racial/ethnic identity and responses to a multidimensional attitude toward suicide measure. No prior study has compared attitudes across multiple domains and racial/ethnic groups. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research Emerald Publishing

Black Americans report greater resilience to suicide unless its interpersonally motivated and are more accepting of others right to die

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
1759-6599
DOI
10.1108/jacpr-03-2021-0592
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Suicide is a public health crisis that differentially affects racial and ethnic groups. Suicide is a public health crisis that differentially affects racial and ethnic groups. American Indians had the highest per capita suicide rates (11.1 for females and 33.4 for males) followed by White Americans (8.0 for females and 29.8 for males; Centers for Disease Control, 2019). There is an emerging focus on racial/ethnic disparities in suicide prevention research. Prior studies suggest that more accepting attitudes toward suicide are associated with elevated suicide risk status. As such, this study aims to examine the association between racial/ethnic identity and three attitude domains: the right to die, interpersonal gestures and resilience.Design/methodology/approachGeneral linear models were used to compare racial/ethnic groups in right to die, interpersonal gestures and resilience attitudes.FindingsParticipants who identified as Native American or Black were more likely than participants who identified as White, Bi/Multi-racial and Hispanic to hold attitudes supporting interpersonal motivations for suicide. Participants who identified as Black were more likely than participants who identified as White to hold right to die attitudes. Participants who identified as Black were more likely than White participants to report not viewing suicide as an option. These results suggest that racial/ethnic identity impacts attitudes toward suicide. People who identify as Native American or Black may be more likely to see suicide as acceptable for interpersonal reasons despite those who identify as Black being less likely to see suicide as an option. This study has implications for suicide prevention programs and interventions within racial/ethnic communities. Focusing interventions on attitudes supporting interpersonal motivations for suicide may increase effectiveness within Native American and Black communities.Originality/valueThis study aimed to fill a gap in suicide prevention research by examining associations between racial/ethnic identity and responses to a multidimensional attitude toward suicide measure. No prior study has compared attitudes across multiple domains and racial/ethnic groups.

Journal

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace ResearchEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 1, 2021

Keywords: Suicide; Ethnicity; Attitudes; Race; Native American; Black; Beliefs

References