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Agricultural lending and early warning models of bank failures for the late 2000s Great Recession

Agricultural lending and early warning models of bank failures for the late 2000s Great Recession Purpose – The late 2000s Great Recession led to a surge of bank failures in the USA with nearly 300 banks failing from 2009 to 2010. Recalling the farm crises of the 1980s where the farm sector was pinpointed as one of the major precursors of such crises, this study is an attempt to validate if the agricultural sector can once again be considered as a major instigator of the current financial crises. Design/methodology/approach – An early warning model is developed based on factors that may cause bank failures, with special attention given to the role of the agricultural lending portfolios of commercial banks. The model will have several time period versions that will determine the length of time prior to the actual bank bankruptcy declarations that early warning signals could be detected. Findings – The empirical results indicate that credit exposure to the farm sector does not necessarily enhance a bank's tendency to fail or its probability of success or survival. This lends support to the reality that agricultural loan delinquency rates are consistently below the banks' overall loan delinquency rates, thus confirming that agricultural lenders are in relatively stronger financial health. This study instead finds that costly funding arrangements, increasing interest rate risk, and declining asset quality can be possible early warning signals that can be detected as far back as two or three years before eventual bank failure. Originality/value – This study differentiates itself from previous studies by its special focus on the role of the agricultural finance industry in the ensuing economic crises. This study's early warning model also presents an extended version of previous empirical models as it accounts for measures of capital adequacy, asset quality, management risk, profitability, liquidity risk, loan portfolio composition and risk, funding arrangement, structural and macroeconomic variables. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Agricultural Finance Review Emerald Publishing

Agricultural lending and early warning models of bank failures for the late 2000s Great Recession

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References (24)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0002-1466
DOI
10.1108/00021461311321357
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The late 2000s Great Recession led to a surge of bank failures in the USA with nearly 300 banks failing from 2009 to 2010. Recalling the farm crises of the 1980s where the farm sector was pinpointed as one of the major precursors of such crises, this study is an attempt to validate if the agricultural sector can once again be considered as a major instigator of the current financial crises. Design/methodology/approach – An early warning model is developed based on factors that may cause bank failures, with special attention given to the role of the agricultural lending portfolios of commercial banks. The model will have several time period versions that will determine the length of time prior to the actual bank bankruptcy declarations that early warning signals could be detected. Findings – The empirical results indicate that credit exposure to the farm sector does not necessarily enhance a bank's tendency to fail or its probability of success or survival. This lends support to the reality that agricultural loan delinquency rates are consistently below the banks' overall loan delinquency rates, thus confirming that agricultural lenders are in relatively stronger financial health. This study instead finds that costly funding arrangements, increasing interest rate risk, and declining asset quality can be possible early warning signals that can be detected as far back as two or three years before eventual bank failure. Originality/value – This study differentiates itself from previous studies by its special focus on the role of the agricultural finance industry in the ensuing economic crises. This study's early warning model also presents an extended version of previous empirical models as it accounts for measures of capital adequacy, asset quality, management risk, profitability, liquidity risk, loan portfolio composition and risk, funding arrangement, structural and macroeconomic variables.

Journal

Agricultural Finance ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: May 3, 2013

Keywords: Agricultural loans; Bank failures; Early warning signals; Funding arrangements; Interest rate risk; Late 2000s Great Recession; Liquidity risk; Loan portfolio risk; Risk‐weighted capital ratio; Agriculture; Banks; Financing

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