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Aggression in Iranian adolescent girls: role of depressive mood, dysphoric disorder and premenstrual syndrome

Aggression in Iranian adolescent girls: role of depressive mood, dysphoric disorder and... Aggression is a destructive experience in terms of social and public health. The purpose of this paper is to determine the role of depressive mood, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and premenstrual syndrome (PMS) in adolescent girls’ aggression.Design/methodology/approachIn a cross-sectional study, 510 girl students were selected by multistage cluster sampling from Lahijan and Sangar high schools (Northern Iran) in the 2017–2018 academic year, and each of them responded to the short version of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-13), Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool and Ahvaz Aggression Inventory. Data were analyzed by point-biserial and Pearson’s correlation coefficients, univariate analysis of covariance in the form of 2 × 3 factorial design and Hochberg’s GT2 post hoc test.FindingsThe questionnaires of 475 students were returned correctly (survey validity=93 percent). The results of ANCOVA after adjustment for confounding variables such as age and physical illness history revealed that the existence of main effect for depressive mood (F=31.50, df=1, p<0.0001) and PMS and PMDD diagnoses (F=11.39, df=2, p<0.0001) were associated with increased aggression. However, there was no significant interaction effect on aggression levels (p>0.05). Additionally, post hoc tests revealed no significant differences between the diagnosis of PMS and PMDD in terms of aggression (p>0.05).Research limitations/implicationsThe present study has some limitations. Depressive mood and diagnoses of PMS and PMDD were defined through relying on the self-report data and cut points suggested by the questionnaires. Obviously, change of measurement tools or even cut points reduces the results reliability and repeatability. Furthermore, the research plan does not allow us to infer causal relations and does not provide information about the direction of the relationship between depression symptoms, PMS and PMDD diagnoses, and aggression. Finally, the present study is relied on high schools’ data, and the results cannot be generalized to other adolescent girls.Originality/valueDespite the limitations of this study, its findings offer new insights into the factors influencing the perpetration of aggression in Iranian adolescent girls. Depressed adolescent girls and those receiving a PMS or PMDD diagnosis are more likely to develop aggression. These findings can be used in high schools to design educational and health-based interventions in order to reduce and prevent anger and resentment in adolescent girls. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research Emerald Publishing

Aggression in Iranian adolescent girls: role of depressive mood, dysphoric disorder and premenstrual syndrome

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
1759-6599
DOI
10.1108/jacpr-06-2019-0422
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aggression is a destructive experience in terms of social and public health. The purpose of this paper is to determine the role of depressive mood, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and premenstrual syndrome (PMS) in adolescent girls’ aggression.Design/methodology/approachIn a cross-sectional study, 510 girl students were selected by multistage cluster sampling from Lahijan and Sangar high schools (Northern Iran) in the 2017–2018 academic year, and each of them responded to the short version of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-13), Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool and Ahvaz Aggression Inventory. Data were analyzed by point-biserial and Pearson’s correlation coefficients, univariate analysis of covariance in the form of 2 × 3 factorial design and Hochberg’s GT2 post hoc test.FindingsThe questionnaires of 475 students were returned correctly (survey validity=93 percent). The results of ANCOVA after adjustment for confounding variables such as age and physical illness history revealed that the existence of main effect for depressive mood (F=31.50, df=1, p<0.0001) and PMS and PMDD diagnoses (F=11.39, df=2, p<0.0001) were associated with increased aggression. However, there was no significant interaction effect on aggression levels (p>0.05). Additionally, post hoc tests revealed no significant differences between the diagnosis of PMS and PMDD in terms of aggression (p>0.05).Research limitations/implicationsThe present study has some limitations. Depressive mood and diagnoses of PMS and PMDD were defined through relying on the self-report data and cut points suggested by the questionnaires. Obviously, change of measurement tools or even cut points reduces the results reliability and repeatability. Furthermore, the research plan does not allow us to infer causal relations and does not provide information about the direction of the relationship between depression symptoms, PMS and PMDD diagnoses, and aggression. Finally, the present study is relied on high schools’ data, and the results cannot be generalized to other adolescent girls.Originality/valueDespite the limitations of this study, its findings offer new insights into the factors influencing the perpetration of aggression in Iranian adolescent girls. Depressed adolescent girls and those receiving a PMS or PMDD diagnosis are more likely to develop aggression. These findings can be used in high schools to design educational and health-based interventions in order to reduce and prevent anger and resentment in adolescent girls.

Journal

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace ResearchEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 1, 2019

Keywords: Adolescent; Depression; Aggression; Girl; Premenstrual dysphoric disorder; Premenstrual syndrome

References