Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

William Chambers, the ‘Very pretty Conoisseur’ – the interiors at Duddingston House and the Inventory of 1790

William Chambers, the ‘Very pretty Conoisseur’ – the interiors at Duddingston House and the... This paper constitutes a short introduction to the fascinating and revealing inventory of the contents of Duddingston House (designed by Chambers in 1763 for fames, 8th Earl of Abercorn), compiled in June 1790 following the death of the Earl in the previous year. 1 The interest of the inventory lies not only in the description of the contents and decoration of the house (furniture, curtains, carpets, china etc, down to sheetsfor the ‘Common servants’ and 30 plain pewter plates for the servants hall ‘almost wore out’), but also in the light that it sheds on the way in which the house was used. From the titles of the rooms, the list ofthefurniture in each room, and the order in which they are given, one can deduce where each room was, and how it was used; one can literally follow the inventory's compiler on a guided tour from room to room round the house (Figures 2.1 and 2.2). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

William Chambers, the ‘Very pretty Conoisseur’ – the interiors at Duddingston House and the Inventory of 1790

Architectural Heritage , Volume 11 (1): 12 – Jan 1, 2000

Loading next page...
 
/lp/edinburgh-university-press/william-chambers-the-very-pretty-conoisseur-the-interiors-at-0Xwm4ZCUzT

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2000.11.1.12
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper constitutes a short introduction to the fascinating and revealing inventory of the contents of Duddingston House (designed by Chambers in 1763 for fames, 8th Earl of Abercorn), compiled in June 1790 following the death of the Earl in the previous year. 1 The interest of the inventory lies not only in the description of the contents and decoration of the house (furniture, curtains, carpets, china etc, down to sheetsfor the ‘Common servants’ and 30 plain pewter plates for the servants hall ‘almost wore out’), but also in the light that it sheds on the way in which the house was used. From the titles of the rooms, the list ofthefurniture in each room, and the order in which they are given, one can deduce where each room was, and how it was used; one can literally follow the inventory's compiler on a guided tour from room to room round the house (Figures 2.1 and 2.2).

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.