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We have an anchor that keeps the soul: religious observance on Glasgows Anchor line and other Scottish emigrant ships, 18701900

We have an anchor that keeps the soul: religious observance on Glasgows Anchor line and other... We have an anchor that keeps the soul'. religious observance on Glasgow's Anchor line and other Scottish emigrant ships, 1870-1900 ANDREW T.N. MUIRHEAD, M.A., M.Litt., MCLIP The Act of Parliament governing ships in the emigration trade is quite clear: "Article 16: On Sunday mornings the passengers shall be mustered at ten o'clock, am., and will be expected to appear in clean and decent apparel. The Lord's Day shall be observed as religiously as circumstances will admit". The issue of Sabbath observance, and specifically of Sunday travelling, is one which has bubbled away in Scottish life for the last 200 years or so. One substantial battle had been fought over the provision of railway travel on Sundays. Whether that battle had been won or lost depends on the standpoint of the individual, but, by 1865, trains were running on Sundays.2 Steamers' sailing on Sundays may still be divisive in Stomoway, but of course for the emigrant ships which took so many Scots to Australia, to the USA, to Canada and everywhere else that the Scottish diaspora inhabits, there was no choice. In a voyage of 11 days, which is the length of voyage undertaken by the late Victorian traveller from http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scottish Church History Edinburgh University Press

We have an anchor that keeps the soul: religious observance on Glasgows Anchor line and other Scottish emigrant ships, 18701900

Scottish Church History , Volume 40 (1): 26 – Jun 1, 2010

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2516-6298
eISSN
2516-6301
DOI
10.3366/sch.2010.40.1.8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We have an anchor that keeps the soul'. religious observance on Glasgow's Anchor line and other Scottish emigrant ships, 1870-1900 ANDREW T.N. MUIRHEAD, M.A., M.Litt., MCLIP The Act of Parliament governing ships in the emigration trade is quite clear: "Article 16: On Sunday mornings the passengers shall be mustered at ten o'clock, am., and will be expected to appear in clean and decent apparel. The Lord's Day shall be observed as religiously as circumstances will admit". The issue of Sabbath observance, and specifically of Sunday travelling, is one which has bubbled away in Scottish life for the last 200 years or so. One substantial battle had been fought over the provision of railway travel on Sundays. Whether that battle had been won or lost depends on the standpoint of the individual, but, by 1865, trains were running on Sundays.2 Steamers' sailing on Sundays may still be divisive in Stomoway, but of course for the emigrant ships which took so many Scots to Australia, to the USA, to Canada and everywhere else that the Scottish diaspora inhabits, there was no choice. In a voyage of 11 days, which is the length of voyage undertaken by the late Victorian traveller from

Journal

Scottish Church HistoryEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2010

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