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Virginia Woolf and the Child Poet

Virginia Woolf and the Child Poet Emily James The merest schoolgirl, when she falls in love, has Shakespeare or Keats to speak her mind for her; but let a sufferer try to describe a pain in his head to a doctor and language at once runs dry. There is nothing ready made for him. He is forced to coin words himself, and, taking his pain in one hand, and a lump of pure sound in the other (as perhaps the people of Babel did in the beginning), so to crush them together that a brand new word in the end drops out. Probably it will be something laughable. -- Virginia Woolf1 In 1930, Virginia Woolf received a query from an adolescent girl accompanied by as Woolf would later describe, `piles of dirty copy books written in a scrawl without any spelling'. By early 1931, the Hogarth Press had published these poems in a slim pink volume ­ the first of three volumes of poetry by Joan Adeney Easdale. This `girl poet', described by Woolf so dismissively, would be lauded a child prodigy in London within the year. By late 1931, Easdale's poetry had earned high praise from The Spectator, The Bookman, and the Times http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

Virginia Woolf and the Child Poet

Modernist Cultures , Volume 7 (2): 279 – Oct 1, 2012

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2012
Subject
Articles; Film, Media and Cultural Studies
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2012.0042
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Emily James The merest schoolgirl, when she falls in love, has Shakespeare or Keats to speak her mind for her; but let a sufferer try to describe a pain in his head to a doctor and language at once runs dry. There is nothing ready made for him. He is forced to coin words himself, and, taking his pain in one hand, and a lump of pure sound in the other (as perhaps the people of Babel did in the beginning), so to crush them together that a brand new word in the end drops out. Probably it will be something laughable. -- Virginia Woolf1 In 1930, Virginia Woolf received a query from an adolescent girl accompanied by as Woolf would later describe, `piles of dirty copy books written in a scrawl without any spelling'. By early 1931, the Hogarth Press had published these poems in a slim pink volume ­ the first of three volumes of poetry by Joan Adeney Easdale. This `girl poet', described by Woolf so dismissively, would be lauded a child prodigy in London within the year. By late 1931, Easdale's poetry had earned high praise from The Spectator, The Bookman, and the Times

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2012

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