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URBAN SOCIAL AND DEMOGRAPHIC RECONSTITUTION. THE CASE OF EIGHTEENTH CENTURY ODENSE

URBAN SOCIAL AND DEMOGRAPHIC RECONSTITUTION. THE CASE OF EIGHTEENTH CENTURY ODENSE Due to high levels of migration the need to combine information from several sources with scanty identifiers, work on urban places in periods before the nineteenth century meets with severe record linkage problems. This article describes a method using houses, rather than families as the central unit when combining individual level data. The resulting database has been used for a comprehensive community study of the Danish town Odense during the 18th century. studying the lives of ordinary citizens in the eighteenth century, there is a scarcity of narrative source material such as newspapers diaries that give detailed information about individuals groups. Denmark is no exception. However, many sources provide individual level data indirectly which may disclose aspects of a population's demographic social history. This was the point of departure when research began on a detailed study of eighteenthcentury urban life in Denmark. Traditional first-generation family reconstitution studies, however, used only parish registers as sources used the married couple as the uniting unit around which all information was assembled.1 Typical identification problems met with when creating the correct linkages in these studies, include high name frequencies, unstardized name spellings, incomplete information, such as missing age at death. Also, the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing Edinburgh University Press

URBAN SOCIAL AND DEMOGRAPHIC RECONSTITUTION. THE CASE OF EIGHTEENTH CENTURY ODENSE

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1753-8548
eISSN
1755-1706
DOI
10.3366/hac.1999.11.1-2.115
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Due to high levels of migration the need to combine information from several sources with scanty identifiers, work on urban places in periods before the nineteenth century meets with severe record linkage problems. This article describes a method using houses, rather than families as the central unit when combining individual level data. The resulting database has been used for a comprehensive community study of the Danish town Odense during the 18th century. studying the lives of ordinary citizens in the eighteenth century, there is a scarcity of narrative source material such as newspapers diaries that give detailed information about individuals groups. Denmark is no exception. However, many sources provide individual level data indirectly which may disclose aspects of a population's demographic social history. This was the point of departure when research began on a detailed study of eighteenthcentury urban life in Denmark. Traditional first-generation family reconstitution studies, however, used only parish registers as sources used the married couple as the uniting unit around which all information was assembled.1 Typical identification problems met with when creating the correct linkages in these studies, include high name frequencies, unstardized name spellings, incomplete information, such as missing age at death. Also, the

Journal

International Journal of Humanities and Arts ComputingEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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