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Two Essays on Ruins Translated with an Introduction and Notes by José María Rodríguez García

Two Essays on Ruins Translated with an Introduction and Notes by José María Rodríguez García María Zambrano: Two Essays on Ruins (Translated with an Introduction and Notes by José María Rodríguez García)1 Translator’s Introduction María Zambrano (born in Vélez Málaga, 1904 – died in Madrid, 1991) is widely recognised as one of Spain’s three most influential philosophers of the twentieth century, along with Miguel de Unamuno (1864–1936) and José Ortega y Gasset (1883–1955), whose work she engaged in multiple ways in the course of a long writing career. The daughter of a progressive educator and socialist militant (Blas Zambrano, a good friend of the poet Antonio Machado), she studied at Madrid’s Universidad Central under Ortega y Gasset. There she had as her teachers two other eminent thinkers – Manuel García Morente and Xavier Zubiri – who, like her, have long been overshadowed by Ortega’s prodigious industriousness, personal charisma, and ability to compromise with the powers that be. Despite her indebtedness to these two teachers and to Ortega himself, Zambrano is unique not just because she was a woman, but also because her writing is often closer to poetry than to philosophy, without necessarily connoting a gendered form of discourse. In this respect she resembles and surpasses Unamuno. This introduction will outline the literary http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

Two Essays on Ruins Translated with an Introduction and Notes by José María Rodríguez García

Modernist Cultures , Volume 7 (1): 98 – May 1, 2012

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2012
Subject
Film, Media and Cultural Studies
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2012.0030
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

María Zambrano: Two Essays on Ruins (Translated with an Introduction and Notes by José María Rodríguez García)1 Translator’s Introduction María Zambrano (born in Vélez Málaga, 1904 – died in Madrid, 1991) is widely recognised as one of Spain’s three most influential philosophers of the twentieth century, along with Miguel de Unamuno (1864–1936) and José Ortega y Gasset (1883–1955), whose work she engaged in multiple ways in the course of a long writing career. The daughter of a progressive educator and socialist militant (Blas Zambrano, a good friend of the poet Antonio Machado), she studied at Madrid’s Universidad Central under Ortega y Gasset. There she had as her teachers two other eminent thinkers – Manuel García Morente and Xavier Zubiri – who, like her, have long been overshadowed by Ortega’s prodigious industriousness, personal charisma, and ability to compromise with the powers that be. Despite her indebtedness to these two teachers and to Ortega himself, Zambrano is unique not just because she was a woman, but also because her writing is often closer to poetry than to philosophy, without necessarily connoting a gendered form of discourse. In this respect she resembles and surpasses Unamuno. This introduction will outline the literary

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: May 1, 2012

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