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Transnational Corporations, Civil Society Organisations and Social Accountability in Nigeria's Oil and Gas Industry

Transnational Corporations, Civil Society Organisations and Social Accountability in Nigeria's... EVARISTUS OSHIONEBO* I. INTRODUCTION Civil agitation against the irresponsible behaviour of transnational corporations (TNCs) engaged in the extraction of oil and gas in Nigeria has intensified in the recent past, a development which has been aided by several factors. Nigeria is ethnically diverse and so, vast arrays of competing interests are always at play in oil and gas-related issues. Also, political events in Nigeria appear to have fostered a modestly active civil society. Nigeria had, in the recent past, been ruled by a seemingly endless number of military dictators. In response, a number of civil groups were formed to provide opposition to the dictatorships. With the advent of democracy in Nigeria in 1999, some of these groups have now channelled their energy and resources to other causes, including corporate responsibility and accountability. Most significantly, civil agitations in Nigeria’s oil producing communities are as much political as they are social. These communities are perhaps the least developed in Nigeria even though they produce almost all of the country’s oil and gas wealth. This has led to their understandable struggle for development and for access to natural resources on their land. This Article considers the potential for civil society groups http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png African Journal of International and Comparative Law Edinburgh University Press

Transnational Corporations, Civil Society Organisations and Social Accountability in Nigeria's Oil and Gas Industry

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
0954-8890
eISSN
1755-1609
DOI
10.3366/ajicl.2007.15.1.107
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

EVARISTUS OSHIONEBO* I. INTRODUCTION Civil agitation against the irresponsible behaviour of transnational corporations (TNCs) engaged in the extraction of oil and gas in Nigeria has intensified in the recent past, a development which has been aided by several factors. Nigeria is ethnically diverse and so, vast arrays of competing interests are always at play in oil and gas-related issues. Also, political events in Nigeria appear to have fostered a modestly active civil society. Nigeria had, in the recent past, been ruled by a seemingly endless number of military dictators. In response, a number of civil groups were formed to provide opposition to the dictatorships. With the advent of democracy in Nigeria in 1999, some of these groups have now channelled their energy and resources to other causes, including corporate responsibility and accountability. Most significantly, civil agitations in Nigeria’s oil producing communities are as much political as they are social. These communities are perhaps the least developed in Nigeria even though they produce almost all of the country’s oil and gas wealth. This has led to their understandable struggle for development and for access to natural resources on their land. This Article considers the potential for civil society groups

Journal

African Journal of International and Comparative LawEdinburgh University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2007

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