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Towards a Definition of the ‘long modernist novel’

Towards a Definition of the ‘long modernist novel’ <jats:p> This paper considers a number of long fictions from the modernist period to see how far their length serves specifically modernist concerns, especially temporality and history. Various extended narratives suit modernist aesthetic mythopoeia for which Nietzsche's essay on The Advantages and Disadvantages of History for Life provides a philosophical articulation. Joyce's Ulysses, Proust's A la recherche, and Mann's Joseph and his Brothers (along with Lawrence's The Rainbow and Women in Love) are the principal works compared and contrasted. But there are authors who stand apart from these encompassing, if not to say masterful, mythopoeic visions. Musil's unfinished Man without Qualities resists the modes of resolution which in several of the former instances have a strongly masculinist inflection. So too, to a significant extent, does Lawrence with his strongly feminine sensibility. Above all, Virginia Woolf and Dorothy Richardson, while engaging with similar concerns, constitute a critical outside to the mythopoeic grouping. </jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

Towards a Definition of the ‘long modernist novel’

Modernist Cultures , Volume 10 (3): 282 – Nov 1, 2015

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2015
Subject
Articles; Film, Media and Cultural Studies
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2015.0115
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p> This paper considers a number of long fictions from the modernist period to see how far their length serves specifically modernist concerns, especially temporality and history. Various extended narratives suit modernist aesthetic mythopoeia for which Nietzsche's essay on The Advantages and Disadvantages of History for Life provides a philosophical articulation. Joyce's Ulysses, Proust's A la recherche, and Mann's Joseph and his Brothers (along with Lawrence's The Rainbow and Women in Love) are the principal works compared and contrasted. But there are authors who stand apart from these encompassing, if not to say masterful, mythopoeic visions. Musil's unfinished Man without Qualities resists the modes of resolution which in several of the former instances have a strongly masculinist inflection. So too, to a significant extent, does Lawrence with his strongly feminine sensibility. Above all, Virginia Woolf and Dorothy Richardson, while engaging with similar concerns, constitute a critical outside to the mythopoeic grouping. </jats:p>

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2015

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