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The Temple of Harmony:: New Research on St Cecilia's Hall, Edinburgh

The Temple of Harmony:: New Research on St Cecilia's Hall, Edinburgh Joe Rock St Cecilia’s Hall in Niddry Street, Edinburgh, was built between 1761 and 1763 as a private concert hall and practice space for the members of the Edinburgh Musical Society. This was an exclusive male club of well-to-do legal, merchant and aristocratic members, who actively participated in the performance of music. As their ambitions grew they employed professional musicians, and to pay for these artists they increased their membership and arranged concerts, to which ladies were at first, somewhat grudgingly, invited.1 This paper examines the history of the design and construction of the building from 1755, along with the changes made to it between 1763 and the departure of the Musical Society in 1801. There are a number of informative publications on St Cecilia’s Hall, beginning with the book by David Fraser Harris, St Cecilia’s Hall in the Niddry Wynd, published in 1899, and W. Forbes Gray’s article ‘The Musical Society of Edinburgh and St Cecilia’s Hall’, published in the Book of the Old Edinburgh Club, volume XIX in 1933. More recently there have been articles by Jane Blackie (2002); authoritative in its presentation of new material, and a paper by Deborah Howard, written in honour of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

The Temple of Harmony:: New Research on St Cecilia's Hall, Edinburgh

Architectural Heritage , Volume 20 (1): 55 – Nov 1, 2009

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© The Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland, 2009
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/E1350752409000193
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Joe Rock St Cecilia’s Hall in Niddry Street, Edinburgh, was built between 1761 and 1763 as a private concert hall and practice space for the members of the Edinburgh Musical Society. This was an exclusive male club of well-to-do legal, merchant and aristocratic members, who actively participated in the performance of music. As their ambitions grew they employed professional musicians, and to pay for these artists they increased their membership and arranged concerts, to which ladies were at first, somewhat grudgingly, invited.1 This paper examines the history of the design and construction of the building from 1755, along with the changes made to it between 1763 and the departure of the Musical Society in 1801. There are a number of informative publications on St Cecilia’s Hall, beginning with the book by David Fraser Harris, St Cecilia’s Hall in the Niddry Wynd, published in 1899, and W. Forbes Gray’s article ‘The Musical Society of Edinburgh and St Cecilia’s Hall’, published in the Book of the Old Edinburgh Club, volume XIX in 1933. More recently there have been articles by Jane Blackie (2002); authoritative in its presentation of new material, and a paper by Deborah Howard, written in honour of

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2009

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