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The Study of Pagan Religions in Enlightenment Scotland: The Case of Thomas Blackwell (1701–1757)

The Study of Pagan Religions in Enlightenment Scotland: The Case of Thomas Blackwell (1701–1757) The Study of Pagan Religions in Enlightenment Scotland: The Case of Thomas Blackwell (1701–1757)* FELICITY LOUGHLIN Thomas Blackwell (1701–1757), Professor of Greek at Marischal College in Aberdeen, is seldom accorded the place he deserves among the great luminaries of the Scottish Enlightenment. Although his writings on antiquity enjoyed considerable renown in eighteenth- century Europe, by the mid-nineteenth century Blackwell was largely forgotten. Over the course of the twentieth century, however, he began to attract scholarly attention. This renewed interest has primarily focused on Blackwell’s contribution to literary criticism, particularly his historicist approach to ancient literature and the influence of his teaching on his students, many of whom went on to become published celebrities in their own right, such as James Macpherson, compiler of The Works of Ossian. A number of historians have also discussed Blackwell’s place in eighteenth- *For advice on the preparation of this article I am extremely grateful to Thomas Ahnert, Stewart J. Brown, Robin Mills, Alexandre Johnston and Clare Loughlin. One exception is Paul B. Wood’s identification of Blackwell as one of the ‘prominent members of the Enlightenment republic of letters’, in his The Aberdeen Enlightenment: The Arts Curriculum in the Eighteenth Century (Aberdeen: Aberdeen University http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scottish Church History Edinburgh University Press

The Study of Pagan Religions in Enlightenment Scotland: The Case of Thomas Blackwell (1701–1757)

Scottish Church History , Volume 45 (1): 17 – Jun 1, 2016

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References (4)

Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2516-6298
eISSN
2516-6301
DOI
10.3366/sch.2016.0007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Study of Pagan Religions in Enlightenment Scotland: The Case of Thomas Blackwell (1701–1757)* FELICITY LOUGHLIN Thomas Blackwell (1701–1757), Professor of Greek at Marischal College in Aberdeen, is seldom accorded the place he deserves among the great luminaries of the Scottish Enlightenment. Although his writings on antiquity enjoyed considerable renown in eighteenth- century Europe, by the mid-nineteenth century Blackwell was largely forgotten. Over the course of the twentieth century, however, he began to attract scholarly attention. This renewed interest has primarily focused on Blackwell’s contribution to literary criticism, particularly his historicist approach to ancient literature and the influence of his teaching on his students, many of whom went on to become published celebrities in their own right, such as James Macpherson, compiler of The Works of Ossian. A number of historians have also discussed Blackwell’s place in eighteenth- *For advice on the preparation of this article I am extremely grateful to Thomas Ahnert, Stewart J. Brown, Robin Mills, Alexandre Johnston and Clare Loughlin. One exception is Paul B. Wood’s identification of Blackwell as one of the ‘prominent members of the Enlightenment republic of letters’, in his The Aberdeen Enlightenment: The Arts Curriculum in the Eighteenth Century (Aberdeen: Aberdeen University

Journal

Scottish Church HistoryEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2016

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