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The Status of the Right to Strike in Nigeria: A Perspective from International and Comparative Law

The Status of the Right to Strike in Nigeria: A Perspective from International and Comparative Law O. V. C. OKENE* I. INTRODUCTION The right to strike is a keystone of modern industrial society. No society which lacks that right can be democratic. Any society which seeks to become democratic must secure that right1 The question as to whether employees have a fundamental right to strike has been the object of considerable academic debate and is a point on which judicial opinions have continually been expressed. There is no doubt that workers throughout the world are alike in the sense that they desire recognition, satisfaction, fair wages and salaries, job security, redress of wrongs and good working conditions. But often the employer and the union (representing workers) find themselves in sharp disagreement. Such friction or disagreement gives rise to trade disputes and strikes. The right to strike is a crucial weapon in the armoury of organised labour. The right is a result of several years of struggle by the working class. The history of this struggle is one of constant class battles, fierce reprisals by the management and the authorities against strikers and heroic self-sacrifice by workers. The right to strike has now been accepted as an indispensable component of a democratic society and a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png African Journal of International and Comparative Law Edinburgh University Press

The Status of the Right to Strike in Nigeria: A Perspective from International and Comparative Law

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
0954-8890
eISSN
1755-1609
DOI
10.3366/ajicl.2007.15.1.29
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

O. V. C. OKENE* I. INTRODUCTION The right to strike is a keystone of modern industrial society. No society which lacks that right can be democratic. Any society which seeks to become democratic must secure that right1 The question as to whether employees have a fundamental right to strike has been the object of considerable academic debate and is a point on which judicial opinions have continually been expressed. There is no doubt that workers throughout the world are alike in the sense that they desire recognition, satisfaction, fair wages and salaries, job security, redress of wrongs and good working conditions. But often the employer and the union (representing workers) find themselves in sharp disagreement. Such friction or disagreement gives rise to trade disputes and strikes. The right to strike is a crucial weapon in the armoury of organised labour. The right is a result of several years of struggle by the working class. The history of this struggle is one of constant class battles, fierce reprisals by the management and the authorities against strikers and heroic self-sacrifice by workers. The right to strike has now been accepted as an indispensable component of a democratic society and a

Journal

African Journal of International and Comparative LawEdinburgh University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2007

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