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The Russian Woolf

The Russian Woolf Virginia Woolf and Russia has been examined but not fully studied. Entirely overlooked has been her response to Russian cinema and dance, particularly the Ballets Russes. This paper addresses that gap through an account of Woolf's response to, and interest in, both Russian film and dance, while also accounting for how she incorporates her admiration of Dostoevsky, Turgenev and other Russian writers into her work. Her study and translations with the Russian Jewish émigré Samuel Koteliansky, a formative influence on her continuing absorption with matters Russian, is also analyzed, as well as the importance of Russian cinematic techniques, notably sound, drawn in part from such Russian directors as V. I. Pudovkin, as well as montage, originating with Lev Kuleshov and Sergei Eisenstein. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

The Russian Woolf

Modernist Cultures , Volume 13 (4): 22 – Nov 1, 2018

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2018.0229
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Virginia Woolf and Russia has been examined but not fully studied. Entirely overlooked has been her response to Russian cinema and dance, particularly the Ballets Russes. This paper addresses that gap through an account of Woolf's response to, and interest in, both Russian film and dance, while also accounting for how she incorporates her admiration of Dostoevsky, Turgenev and other Russian writers into her work. Her study and translations with the Russian Jewish émigré Samuel Koteliansky, a formative influence on her continuing absorption with matters Russian, is also analyzed, as well as the importance of Russian cinematic techniques, notably sound, drawn in part from such Russian directors as V. I. Pudovkin, as well as montage, originating with Lev Kuleshov and Sergei Eisenstein.

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2018

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