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The Revised African Convention on the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources: Prospects for a Comprehensive Treaty for the Management of Africa's Natural Resources

The Revised African Convention on the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources: Prospects for... I. INTRODUCTION The history of environmental protection in Africa dates as far back as the colonial period in African history, and international collaboration to protect the African environment can be traced back to more than one hundred years ago.1 The first international legal instrument for the management of the African environment was signed by the colonial powers on 19 May 1900 in London: the Convention for the Preservation of Wild Animals, Birds, and Fish in Africa.2 Its principal objective was `to prevent the uncontrolled massacre, and ensure the conservation of useful or inoffensive' wild animal species in African colonies.3 The 1900 Convention had a narrow approach to the notion of conservation and a substantially restrictive interpretation of the African ecosystem premised on the need to regulate and maintain the viability of commercial exploitation of the African wild flora and fauna.4 Significantly, enduring conservation techniques such as the use of annexes or appendices to list protected species and the establishment of reserves and special areas were first adopted under this Convention.5 Dr Erinosho recently completed a PhD in International Environmental Law from the University of Sheffield. Email: bolaerinosho@yahoo.co.uk. 1 S. Lyster, International Wildlife Law: An Analysis of International Treaties http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png African Journal of International and Comparative Law Edinburgh University Press

The Revised African Convention on the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources: Prospects for a Comprehensive Treaty for the Management of Africa's Natural Resources

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2013
Subject
Articles; African Studies
ISSN
0954-8890
eISSN
1755-1609
DOI
10.3366/ajicl.2013.0069
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I. INTRODUCTION The history of environmental protection in Africa dates as far back as the colonial period in African history, and international collaboration to protect the African environment can be traced back to more than one hundred years ago.1 The first international legal instrument for the management of the African environment was signed by the colonial powers on 19 May 1900 in London: the Convention for the Preservation of Wild Animals, Birds, and Fish in Africa.2 Its principal objective was `to prevent the uncontrolled massacre, and ensure the conservation of useful or inoffensive' wild animal species in African colonies.3 The 1900 Convention had a narrow approach to the notion of conservation and a substantially restrictive interpretation of the African ecosystem premised on the need to regulate and maintain the viability of commercial exploitation of the African wild flora and fauna.4 Significantly, enduring conservation techniques such as the use of annexes or appendices to list protected species and the establishment of reserves and special areas were first adopted under this Convention.5 Dr Erinosho recently completed a PhD in International Environmental Law from the University of Sheffield. Email: bolaerinosho@yahoo.co.uk. 1 S. Lyster, International Wildlife Law: An Analysis of International Treaties

Journal

African Journal of International and Comparative LawEdinburgh University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2013

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