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The reconstruction of Episcopalian identity in Scotland: the renunciation of the Stuart allegiance in 1788

The reconstruction of Episcopalian identity in Scotland: the renunciation of the Stuart... The reconstruction of Episcopalian identity in Scotland: the renunciation of the Stuart allegiance in 1788 ROWA N STRONG , B.A., L.Th. Theol. M , Ph.D. Around the middle of February 1788 Episcopalians in Scotland received the news that Prince Charles Edward Stuart, son of their James VIII, and heir to the Stuart claim to the thrones of Scotland and England, had died in Rome. His claim was inherited by his brother, Henry, a Roman Catholic cardinal, who was quick to claim his birthright as Henry IX. But it was a claim that no one bothered with any more; neither the French who had supported his father and grandfather, nor the pope who had forbidden the cardinals to have any more to do with the Stuarts living in genteel poverty in the Palazzo Muti. And now the Stuart's last and most substantial body of dogged supporters,1 the greatly reduced numbers of Scottish nonjuring Episcopalians, prepared finally also to relinquish their allegiance to the Stuart dynasty. It was ninety-nine years since that loyalty had lost them the prize of the established Church of Scotland to the Presbyterians when they elected to regard their oaths to James VII as inviolable. So how http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scottish Church History Edinburgh University Press

The reconstruction of Episcopalian identity in Scotland: the renunciation of the Stuart allegiance in 1788

Scottish Church History , Volume 33 (1): 22 – Jun 1, 2003

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References (4)

Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2516-6298
eISSN
2516-6301
DOI
10.3366/sch.2003.33.1.5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The reconstruction of Episcopalian identity in Scotland: the renunciation of the Stuart allegiance in 1788 ROWA N STRONG , B.A., L.Th. Theol. M , Ph.D. Around the middle of February 1788 Episcopalians in Scotland received the news that Prince Charles Edward Stuart, son of their James VIII, and heir to the Stuart claim to the thrones of Scotland and England, had died in Rome. His claim was inherited by his brother, Henry, a Roman Catholic cardinal, who was quick to claim his birthright as Henry IX. But it was a claim that no one bothered with any more; neither the French who had supported his father and grandfather, nor the pope who had forbidden the cardinals to have any more to do with the Stuarts living in genteel poverty in the Palazzo Muti. And now the Stuart's last and most substantial body of dogged supporters,1 the greatly reduced numbers of Scottish nonjuring Episcopalians, prepared finally also to relinquish their allegiance to the Stuart dynasty. It was ninety-nine years since that loyalty had lost them the prize of the established Church of Scotland to the Presbyterians when they elected to regard their oaths to James VII as inviolable. So how

Journal

Scottish Church HistoryEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2003

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