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The Reception of the 1643 Solemn League and Covenant

The Reception of the 1643 Solemn League and Covenant The Reception of the 1643 Solemn League and Covenant Jamie McDougall The historiography of the Solemn League and Covenant is extensive, and although modern historiography is too heavily focused on its political implications, we have a good understanding of how the three kingdom covenant was achieved. Colin Kidd has demonstrated that commitment to the Solemn League and Covenant remained imperative to a number of contemporaries during the union debates of 1702–07, and played an important role in directing the debates and negotiations of that period. Moreover, popular manifestations of commitment to the covenants emerged during the Restoration period in the form of large scale outdoor field conventicles and continued to have an influence on politics and literature into the eighteenth century. In order to understand why the Solemn League had such a lasting legacy it is essential to understand how it was received in the parishes. The topic of reception has recently been broached by Laura Stewart in relation to the National Covenant. Stewart argued that the process of swearing and subscribing the covenant created an ‘imagined national community’, and that the Colin Kidd, Union and Unionisms: Political Thought in Scotland 1500–2000 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), pp. 75–76; http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scottish Church History Edinburgh University Press

The Reception of the 1643 Solemn League and Covenant

Scottish Church History , Volume 45 (1): 17 – Jun 1, 2016

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References (3)

Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2516-6298
eISSN
2516-6301
DOI
10.3366/sch.2016.0005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Reception of the 1643 Solemn League and Covenant Jamie McDougall The historiography of the Solemn League and Covenant is extensive, and although modern historiography is too heavily focused on its political implications, we have a good understanding of how the three kingdom covenant was achieved. Colin Kidd has demonstrated that commitment to the Solemn League and Covenant remained imperative to a number of contemporaries during the union debates of 1702–07, and played an important role in directing the debates and negotiations of that period. Moreover, popular manifestations of commitment to the covenants emerged during the Restoration period in the form of large scale outdoor field conventicles and continued to have an influence on politics and literature into the eighteenth century. In order to understand why the Solemn League had such a lasting legacy it is essential to understand how it was received in the parishes. The topic of reception has recently been broached by Laura Stewart in relation to the National Covenant. Stewart argued that the process of swearing and subscribing the covenant created an ‘imagined national community’, and that the Colin Kidd, Union and Unionisms: Political Thought in Scotland 1500–2000 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), pp. 75–76;

Journal

Scottish Church HistoryEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2016

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