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The preestablished harmony in Pettit’s genealogical method

The preestablished harmony in Pettit’s genealogical method Journal of Social and Political Philosophy 2.2 (2023): 212–230 © Edinburgh University Press www.euppublishing.com/jspp Review Symposium: Philip Pettit, The State, Princeton University Press, 2023, viii, 360pp; $39.95/£35.00; ISBN: 9780691182209. Kazutaka Inamura, Miguel Vatter, Tongdong Bai, Qin Cao Response by Philip Pettit KAZUTAKA INAMURA Waseda University In Chapter 1 of his work, Pettit employs a genealogical method to discern the function of a modern state. The method involves a thought experiment process, which can be summarised as follows (21). First, one must imagine a counterfactual world in which humans do not possess a state. Second, one must consider the problems that they would encounter in such a pre-political society and how they would be likely to adjust their behaviours to address those problems. Third, one must investigate the likely effects of those adjustments and see if they would lead to the appearance of an institution that resembles modern states. Finally, if it turns out that such an outcome is beneficial for the individuals involved, it is possible to consider that the beneficial effect counts as a function of a state. Pettit’s method, inspired by the ideas of David Hume, H. L. A. Hart, David Lewis, Bernard Williams and Edward Craig, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Social and Political Philosophy Edinburgh University Press

The preestablished harmony in Pettit’s genealogical method

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2752-7514
eISSN
2752-7522
DOI
10.3366/jspp.2023.0058
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Journal of Social and Political Philosophy 2.2 (2023): 212–230 © Edinburgh University Press www.euppublishing.com/jspp Review Symposium: Philip Pettit, The State, Princeton University Press, 2023, viii, 360pp; $39.95/£35.00; ISBN: 9780691182209. Kazutaka Inamura, Miguel Vatter, Tongdong Bai, Qin Cao Response by Philip Pettit KAZUTAKA INAMURA Waseda University In Chapter 1 of his work, Pettit employs a genealogical method to discern the function of a modern state. The method involves a thought experiment process, which can be summarised as follows (21). First, one must imagine a counterfactual world in which humans do not possess a state. Second, one must consider the problems that they would encounter in such a pre-political society and how they would be likely to adjust their behaviours to address those problems. Third, one must investigate the likely effects of those adjustments and see if they would lead to the appearance of an institution that resembles modern states. Finally, if it turns out that such an outcome is beneficial for the individuals involved, it is possible to consider that the beneficial effect counts as a function of a state. Pettit’s method, inspired by the ideas of David Hume, H. L. A. Hart, David Lewis, Bernard Williams and Edward Craig,

Journal

Journal of Social and Political PhilosophyEdinburgh University Press

Published: Aug 1, 2023

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