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The New Apparatus of Influence: Material Modernism in the Digital Age

The New Apparatus of Influence: Material Modernism in the Digital Age <jats:p> Throughout this paper, I argue for a reapplication of those theories set out by George Bornstein in Material Modernism. More specifically, I suggest that Bornstein's work should be considered in the context of the textual and literary constructs of the digital age. I begin with an account of those elements from Bornstein's argument that I consider to be of most relevance to this particular discourse, giving particular consideration to what he refers to as the ‘bibliographic code.’ I argue that this notion has gathered fresh momentum now that its potential has been enhanced through new forms of computer-based media. What the material modernists of the modernist movement sought to achieve with the material elements of their works, contemporary scholars and critics can seek to replicate and explore with greater clarity and creativity. The bibliographic code has gained new importance, as the degree by which it can be manipulated, I argue, has been extended significantly. </jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing Edinburgh University Press

The New Apparatus of Influence: Material Modernism in the Digital Age

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2014
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1753-8548
eISSN
1755-1706
DOI
10.3366/ijhac.2014.0131
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p> Throughout this paper, I argue for a reapplication of those theories set out by George Bornstein in Material Modernism. More specifically, I suggest that Bornstein's work should be considered in the context of the textual and literary constructs of the digital age. I begin with an account of those elements from Bornstein's argument that I consider to be of most relevance to this particular discourse, giving particular consideration to what he refers to as the ‘bibliographic code.’ I argue that this notion has gathered fresh momentum now that its potential has been enhanced through new forms of computer-based media. What the material modernists of the modernist movement sought to achieve with the material elements of their works, contemporary scholars and critics can seek to replicate and explore with greater clarity and creativity. The bibliographic code has gained new importance, as the degree by which it can be manipulated, I argue, has been extended significantly. </jats:p>

Journal

International Journal of Humanities and Arts ComputingEdinburgh University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2014

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