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The Long Modernist Novel: An Introduction

The Long Modernist Novel: An Introduction Scott McCracken and Jo Winning This issue of is devoted to the long modernist novel, an excessive form that attempts and fails to achieve the impossible. But what is the long modernist novel and why should length matter? How does it relate to existing categories such as the roman fleuve or new ones such as Franco Moretti's `modern epic'? What is its relationship to disputed concepts such as `stream of consciousness'? How do we periodise the category? What were its antecedents? How does the long modernist novel differ from the long nineteenth-century novel, such as Bleak House or Middlemarch? Was it, as we suggest in this issue, a phenomenon that begins with Henry James's late period and ends with the Second World War? Or can examples be found in the second half of the twentieth century? A novel such as Miguel Asturias's Guatemalan epic, Men of Maize (Hombres de Maíz), published in 1949, seems like an obvious successor, but where do we put later Latin American works such as those by Carlos Fuentes or more recently Roberto Bolaño?1 Do they, like the works of Thomas Pynchon, perhaps fall into the category of postmodernism rather than modernism? For reasons http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

The Long Modernist Novel: An Introduction

Modernist Cultures , Volume 10 (3): 269 – Nov 1, 2015

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2015
Subject
Articles; Film, Media and Cultural Studies
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2015.0114
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Scott McCracken and Jo Winning This issue of is devoted to the long modernist novel, an excessive form that attempts and fails to achieve the impossible. But what is the long modernist novel and why should length matter? How does it relate to existing categories such as the roman fleuve or new ones such as Franco Moretti's `modern epic'? What is its relationship to disputed concepts such as `stream of consciousness'? How do we periodise the category? What were its antecedents? How does the long modernist novel differ from the long nineteenth-century novel, such as Bleak House or Middlemarch? Was it, as we suggest in this issue, a phenomenon that begins with Henry James's late period and ends with the Second World War? Or can examples be found in the second half of the twentieth century? A novel such as Miguel Asturias's Guatemalan epic, Men of Maize (Hombres de Maíz), published in 1949, seems like an obvious successor, but where do we put later Latin American works such as those by Carlos Fuentes or more recently Roberto Bolaño?1 Do they, like the works of Thomas Pynchon, perhaps fall into the category of postmodernism rather than modernism? For reasons

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2015

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