Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Lollard Trail: some clues to the spread of pre-Protestant religious dissent in Scotland, and its legacy

The Lollard Trail: some clues to the spread of pre-Protestant religious dissent in Scotland, and... The Lollard Trail: some clues to the spread of pre-Protestant religious dissent in Scotland, and its legacy MARGARET H.B. SANDERSON, M.A., Ph.D. Introduction There are several reasons why it is helpful to look closely at the early stages of the call for religious reform in Scotland, even although some of the clues to its origin and progress await clarification.' First, it extends the period of reformation back in time. Scotland had a comparatively late Reformation-settlement (in 1560) but concern for reform, and even demand for it, can be traced back into the fifteenth century, when it shared characteristics with those of religious dissent in England and parts of Europe. A consideration of its early stages places Scotland properly within the context of European life and thought. It also reminds us that concern for reform came from within the church, and that early reformers were in favour of transformation and restoration, not schism. Schism when it came was the result of the church's institutional resistance to the reformers' demands. 1 I gratefully acknowledge the earlier work on Scottish lollardy published in Records of the Scottish Church History Society [RSCHS], notably T.M. McNab, "Bohemia and the Scottish Lollards", RSCHS, v (1935), http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scottish Church History Edinburgh University Press

The Lollard Trail: some clues to the spread of pre-Protestant religious dissent in Scotland, and its legacy

Scottish Church History , Volume 33 (1): 33 – Jun 1, 2003

Loading next page...
 
/lp/edinburgh-university-press/the-lollard-trail-some-clues-to-the-spread-of-pre-protestant-religious-lwdTGoylli

References (2)

Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2516-6298
eISSN
2516-6301
DOI
10.3366/sch.2003.33.1.2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Lollard Trail: some clues to the spread of pre-Protestant religious dissent in Scotland, and its legacy MARGARET H.B. SANDERSON, M.A., Ph.D. Introduction There are several reasons why it is helpful to look closely at the early stages of the call for religious reform in Scotland, even although some of the clues to its origin and progress await clarification.' First, it extends the period of reformation back in time. Scotland had a comparatively late Reformation-settlement (in 1560) but concern for reform, and even demand for it, can be traced back into the fifteenth century, when it shared characteristics with those of religious dissent in England and parts of Europe. A consideration of its early stages places Scotland properly within the context of European life and thought. It also reminds us that concern for reform came from within the church, and that early reformers were in favour of transformation and restoration, not schism. Schism when it came was the result of the church's institutional resistance to the reformers' demands. 1 I gratefully acknowledge the earlier work on Scottish lollardy published in Records of the Scottish Church History Society [RSCHS], notably T.M. McNab, "Bohemia and the Scottish Lollards", RSCHS, v (1935),

Journal

Scottish Church HistoryEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2003

There are no references for this article.