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The laird and his guests: The implications of offering hospitality in the Scottish Renaissance country seat

The laird and his guests: The implications of offering hospitality in the Scottish Renaissance... This paper examines how Scottish Renaissance country houses may have evolved to cope with the requirements of noble hospitality. Considerable retinues accompanied aristocratic guests, and the king was normally accompanied on his progresses by a substantial part of his Court. This paper considers whether, in consequence, country house plans evolved to provide first, a guest tower, and then a guest wing – as part of a wider transition from the communality of the Middle Ages to the ranking and privacy of the modern world. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

The laird and his guests: The implications of offering hospitality in the Scottish Renaissance country seat

Architectural Heritage , Volume 13 (13): 1 – Jan 1, 2002

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2002.13.13.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper examines how Scottish Renaissance country houses may have evolved to cope with the requirements of noble hospitality. Considerable retinues accompanied aristocratic guests, and the king was normally accompanied on his progresses by a substantial part of his Court. This paper considers whether, in consequence, country house plans evolved to provide first, a guest tower, and then a guest wing – as part of a wider transition from the communality of the Middle Ages to the ranking and privacy of the modern world.

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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