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The genesis and operation of the Royal Bounty scheme 1725-30

The genesis and operation of the Royal Bounty scheme 1725-30 The genesis and operation of the Royal Bounty scheme 1725-30 DOMHNALL UILLEAM STIÙBHART, M.A., Ph.D. Difficulties faced by ministers in the Gàidhealtachd during the early eighteenth century Although it had been over thirty years since the established Church of Scotland had reverted to presbyterianism in 1690, the number of Gaelic- speaking clergy, especially in the north-west, was still pitifully small.1 Amongst the manifold difficulties facing these ministers, the commonest complaint concerned the sheer unwieldiness of their parishes, many of which had remained largely unchanged since the medieval era. Larger parishes, with their widely scattered population, could comprehend several different places of worship, sometimes as many as four or five, as was the case for Ardnamurchan, "so very Large, Populous and discontiguous that it is Work enough for ffour Ministers".2 Rough territory and weather meant that travel was exceptionally arduous for minister and congregation alike: the Presbytery of Gairloch had to traverse "Severall Bayes Water Lochs Torrent Rivers and pass through spatious Deserts and Hudge mountains", while perhaps a quarter of the parishioners of Rev. James Gilchrist of Kilmallie would be unable to hear him more than once every two months. 1 For background see Douglas Ansdell, The people of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scottish Church History Edinburgh University Press

The genesis and operation of the Royal Bounty scheme 1725-30

Scottish Church History , Volume 33 (1): 79 – Jun 1, 2003

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References (2)

Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2516-6298
eISSN
2516-6301
DOI
10.3366/sch.2003.33.1.4
Publisher site
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Abstract

The genesis and operation of the Royal Bounty scheme 1725-30 DOMHNALL UILLEAM STIÙBHART, M.A., Ph.D. Difficulties faced by ministers in the Gàidhealtachd during the early eighteenth century Although it had been over thirty years since the established Church of Scotland had reverted to presbyterianism in 1690, the number of Gaelic- speaking clergy, especially in the north-west, was still pitifully small.1 Amongst the manifold difficulties facing these ministers, the commonest complaint concerned the sheer unwieldiness of their parishes, many of which had remained largely unchanged since the medieval era. Larger parishes, with their widely scattered population, could comprehend several different places of worship, sometimes as many as four or five, as was the case for Ardnamurchan, "so very Large, Populous and discontiguous that it is Work enough for ffour Ministers".2 Rough territory and weather meant that travel was exceptionally arduous for minister and congregation alike: the Presbytery of Gairloch had to traverse "Severall Bayes Water Lochs Torrent Rivers and pass through spatious Deserts and Hudge mountains", while perhaps a quarter of the parishioners of Rev. James Gilchrist of Kilmallie would be unable to hear him more than once every two months. 1 For background see Douglas Ansdell, The people of

Journal

Scottish Church HistoryEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2003

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