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The Early Years of the Scottish Civic Trust

The Early Years of the Scottish Civic Trust John Gerrard This partly biographical paper details the early years of the Scottish Civic Trust, outlining the key players in establishing the charity organisation, early successes and failures, and drawing on the experiences of the author who was employed there as Assistant Director in 1968. This paper attempts to describe one particular part of what has since been described as ‘the heroic period of conservation’, beginning in London with the founding there in 1956 of the Civic Trust. It was conceived by Duncan Sandys, son-in-law of Winston Churchill, who was at the time a member of the Cabinet and whose role was in effect that of Planning Minister for England and Wales. In that capacity he found himself required to make the final decision on a variety of controversial planning issues. Many involved road building and widening projects that severely affected historic settlements, failing in the process to engage the often outraged concerns of the local public. His prime intention in setting up the Civic Trust was therefore to generate a national movement that would not stop at protecting individual features of the heritage. His chosen method was instead, by means of the Civic Trust, to create an http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

The Early Years of the Scottish Civic Trust

Architectural Heritage , Volume 21 (1): 19 – Nov 1, 2010

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© The Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland, 2011
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2011.0003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

John Gerrard This partly biographical paper details the early years of the Scottish Civic Trust, outlining the key players in establishing the charity organisation, early successes and failures, and drawing on the experiences of the author who was employed there as Assistant Director in 1968. This paper attempts to describe one particular part of what has since been described as ‘the heroic period of conservation’, beginning in London with the founding there in 1956 of the Civic Trust. It was conceived by Duncan Sandys, son-in-law of Winston Churchill, who was at the time a member of the Cabinet and whose role was in effect that of Planning Minister for England and Wales. In that capacity he found himself required to make the final decision on a variety of controversial planning issues. Many involved road building and widening projects that severely affected historic settlements, failing in the process to engage the often outraged concerns of the local public. His prime intention in setting up the Civic Trust was therefore to generate a national movement that would not stop at protecting individual features of the heritage. His chosen method was instead, by means of the Civic Trust, to create an

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2010

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