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The Dutch–German Border: Relating Linguistic, Geographic and Social Distances

The Dutch–German Border: Relating Linguistic, Geographic and Social Distances <jats:p> In this paper we relate linguistic, geographic and social distances to each other in order to get a better understanding of the impact the Dutch-German state border has had on the linguistic characteristics of a sub-area of the Kleverlandish dialect area. This area used to be a perfect dialect continuum. We test three models for explaining today's pattern of linguistic variation in the area. In each model another variable is used as the determinant of linguistic variation: geographic distance (continuum model), the state border (gap model) and social distance (social model). For the social model we use perceptual data for friends, relatives and shopping locations. Testing the three models reveals that nowadays the dialect variation in the research area is closely related to the existence of the state border and to the social structure of the area. The geographic spatial configuration hardly plays a role anymore. </jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing Edinburgh University Press

The Dutch–German Border: Relating Linguistic, Geographic and Social Distances

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press and the Association of History and Computing 2009
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1753-8548
eISSN
1755-1706
DOI
10.3366/E1753854809000342
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p> In this paper we relate linguistic, geographic and social distances to each other in order to get a better understanding of the impact the Dutch-German state border has had on the linguistic characteristics of a sub-area of the Kleverlandish dialect area. This area used to be a perfect dialect continuum. We test three models for explaining today's pattern of linguistic variation in the area. In each model another variable is used as the determinant of linguistic variation: geographic distance (continuum model), the state border (gap model) and social distance (social model). For the social model we use perceptual data for friends, relatives and shopping locations. Testing the three models reveals that nowadays the dialect variation in the research area is closely related to the existence of the state border and to the social structure of the area. The geographic spatial configuration hardly plays a role anymore. </jats:p>

Journal

International Journal of Humanities and Arts ComputingEdinburgh University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2008

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