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The Dalcroze Method, Marie Rambert, and Le Sacre du printemps

The Dalcroze Method, Marie Rambert, and Le Sacre du printemps <jats:p> The standard narrative about the original production of Le Sacre du printemps is that the Ballets Russes dancers hated Nijinsky's choreography; that rehearsals were prolonged; that the work outraged audiences, who rioted; and that the ballet failed and disappeared, but Stravinsky's music endured as modernism's masterpiece. This article offers a revised history, drawing on archival and practice-based research on the method developed by Émile Jaques-Dalcroze, who incorporated movement into music teaching. Starting with what Nijinsky and Diaghilev observed at the Dalcroze institute at Hellerau, I turn to how the dancer Marie Rambert brought embodied knowledge from her Dalcroze background into the rehearsal process to help Nijinsky prepare the dancers to perform the complex work. I then take up the coverage of Dalcroze and Nijinsky that overlapped in newspapers and journals of the time. Finally, I reflect on why their reputations, first joined a century ago, remain intertwined. </jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

The Dalcroze Method, Marie Rambert, and Le Sacre du printemps

Modernist Cultures , Volume 9 (1): 7 – May 1, 2014

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2014
Subject
Articles; Film, Media and Cultural Studies
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2014.0071
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p> The standard narrative about the original production of Le Sacre du printemps is that the Ballets Russes dancers hated Nijinsky's choreography; that rehearsals were prolonged; that the work outraged audiences, who rioted; and that the ballet failed and disappeared, but Stravinsky's music endured as modernism's masterpiece. This article offers a revised history, drawing on archival and practice-based research on the method developed by Émile Jaques-Dalcroze, who incorporated movement into music teaching. Starting with what Nijinsky and Diaghilev observed at the Dalcroze institute at Hellerau, I turn to how the dancer Marie Rambert brought embodied knowledge from her Dalcroze background into the rehearsal process to help Nijinsky prepare the dancers to perform the complex work. I then take up the coverage of Dalcroze and Nijinsky that overlapped in newspapers and journals of the time. Finally, I reflect on why their reputations, first joined a century ago, remain intertwined. </jats:p>

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: May 1, 2014

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