Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The City Hall Housing Scheme: An Administrator and an Architect Deliver Housing out of the Ashes of 1920s Cork

The City Hall Housing Scheme: An Administrator and an Architect Deliver Housing out of the Ashes... In 1916, despite the public housing initiatives of the late nineteenth century, nearly one quarter of Cork city's population of 80,000 lived in unsatisfactory housing. As elsewhere in Ireland and Great Britain, it was not until the 1920s that such initiatives made any impact. In Ireland, this coincided with the transition to independence, a growing interest in town planning and, in Cork, the commissionership of Philip Monahan who was to become the country's first city manager.This paper considers the Capwell municipal housing scheme, built 19268. Although a modest example of the influence of the Garden City Movement, it is highly symbolic of a new political era, being funded from compensation for the rebuilding of the City Hall which was burnt in 1920 by British Forces. Its development also reflects the efforts of a group of professionals and social reformers who sought to improve society through better housing and ideas from abroad. Amongst this group was Daniel Andrew Levie, a Scottish architect from Aberdeen who moved to Cork in 1901, and brought with him a keen concern for social issues along with his training in house design. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

The City Hall Housing Scheme: An Administrator and an Architect Deliver Housing out of the Ashes of 1920s Cork

Architectural Heritage , Volume 27 (1): 20 – Nov 1, 2016

Loading next page...
 
/lp/edinburgh-university-press/the-city-hall-housing-scheme-an-administrator-and-an-architect-deliver-OeSA0VLr6g
Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2017.0083
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In 1916, despite the public housing initiatives of the late nineteenth century, nearly one quarter of Cork city's population of 80,000 lived in unsatisfactory housing. As elsewhere in Ireland and Great Britain, it was not until the 1920s that such initiatives made any impact. In Ireland, this coincided with the transition to independence, a growing interest in town planning and, in Cork, the commissionership of Philip Monahan who was to become the country's first city manager.This paper considers the Capwell municipal housing scheme, built 19268. Although a modest example of the influence of the Garden City Movement, it is highly symbolic of a new political era, being funded from compensation for the rebuilding of the City Hall which was burnt in 1920 by British Forces. Its development also reflects the efforts of a group of professionals and social reformers who sought to improve society through better housing and ideas from abroad. Amongst this group was Daniel Andrew Levie, a Scottish architect from Aberdeen who moved to Cork in 1901, and brought with him a keen concern for social issues along with his training in house design.

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2016

There are no references for this article.