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The Archaeology and Conservation of the Country House: Leslie House and Kinross House

The Archaeology and Conservation of the Country House: Leslie House and Kinross House Nicholas Uglow, Tom Addyman and John Lowrey Between 2010 and 2012, the authors worked on Leslie House, Fife, and Kinross House, Perth & Kinross, both by Sir William Bruce. New discoveries included the predecessor structures, and the effect of the 1760s fire at Leslie, and the original arrangement of the Great Dining Room ceiling at Kinross House. An interdisciplinary approach combining the techniques of architectural history and buildings archaeology was used in both cases, and this paper re-emphasises the importance of this approach in reaching reliable conclusions about historic buildings as well as providing some insights into the workings of these houses at the time of their construction under the guidance of Sir William Bruce. Between 2010 and 2012, the authors worked on two buildings by Sir William Bruce, Leslie House in Fife, and Kinross House in Perth & Kinross. The involvement was the result of planning legislation requiring historic building recording at Leslie and a conservation plan for Kinross before architectural work could begin. In both cases an interdisciplinary research approach was followed, using the techniques of architectural history and buildings archaeology. The interdisciplinary combination of expertise and methodology from both fields is still not common practice http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

The Archaeology and Conservation of the Country House: Leslie House and Kinross House

Architectural Heritage , Volume 23 (1): 163 – Nov 1, 2012

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© The Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland, 2012
Subject
Bruce in today's age of heritage management; Historical Studies
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2012.0038
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nicholas Uglow, Tom Addyman and John Lowrey Between 2010 and 2012, the authors worked on Leslie House, Fife, and Kinross House, Perth & Kinross, both by Sir William Bruce. New discoveries included the predecessor structures, and the effect of the 1760s fire at Leslie, and the original arrangement of the Great Dining Room ceiling at Kinross House. An interdisciplinary approach combining the techniques of architectural history and buildings archaeology was used in both cases, and this paper re-emphasises the importance of this approach in reaching reliable conclusions about historic buildings as well as providing some insights into the workings of these houses at the time of their construction under the guidance of Sir William Bruce. Between 2010 and 2012, the authors worked on two buildings by Sir William Bruce, Leslie House in Fife, and Kinross House in Perth & Kinross. The involvement was the result of planning legislation requiring historic building recording at Leslie and a conservation plan for Kinross before architectural work could begin. In both cases an interdisciplinary research approach was followed, using the techniques of architectural history and buildings archaeology. The interdisciplinary combination of expertise and methodology from both fields is still not common practice

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2012

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