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The Admissibility in Seychelles of Improperly Obtained Fingerprint Evidence: A Comment on Jean François Adrienne & Another v. R (Criminal Appeal SCA25 & 26/2015) [2017] SCCA 25 (11 AUGUST 2017)

The Admissibility in Seychelles of Improperly Obtained Fingerprint Evidence: A Comment on Jean... In Seychelles, the taking of fingerprints is governed by sections 30A, 30B and 30C of the Criminal Procedure Code. Section 30B provides, inter alia, that a police officer may take a sample from a person in custody after seeking his consent and informing him of the right to refuse to give the sample (fingerprint). In Jean François Adrienne & Another v. R the Seychellois Court of Appeal for the first time dealt with the question of the admissibility of fingerprint evidence obtained in violation of the Criminal Procedure Code. The purpose of this article is to assess this judgment and highlight ways in which it is likely to affect the manner in which courts will deal with fingerprint evidence in the future. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png African Journal of International and Comparative Law Edinburgh University Press

The Admissibility in Seychelles of Improperly Obtained Fingerprint Evidence: A Comment on Jean François Adrienne & Another v. R (Criminal Appeal SCA25 & 26/2015) [2017] SCCA 25 (11 AUGUST 2017)

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
0954-8890
eISSN
1755-1609
DOI
10.3366/ajicl.2020.0325
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In Seychelles, the taking of fingerprints is governed by sections 30A, 30B and 30C of the Criminal Procedure Code. Section 30B provides, inter alia, that a police officer may take a sample from a person in custody after seeking his consent and informing him of the right to refuse to give the sample (fingerprint). In Jean François Adrienne & Another v. R the Seychellois Court of Appeal for the first time dealt with the question of the admissibility of fingerprint evidence obtained in violation of the Criminal Procedure Code. The purpose of this article is to assess this judgment and highlight ways in which it is likely to affect the manner in which courts will deal with fingerprint evidence in the future.

Journal

African Journal of International and Comparative LawEdinburgh University Press

Published: Aug 1, 2020

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