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T. S. E. and the TES : Eliot and Educationalism

T. S. E. and the TES : Eliot and Educationalism <jats:p> This article examines T. S. Eliot's response to the wartime discourse of educational reform articulated by the Times Educational Supplement and its editor H. C. Dent. Eliot attacked Dent over three main points: Dent's preference for the centralised direction of British culture via speculative models of ‘democratic’ education; the notion of popular mobilisation and its promotion by the Church; the reliance of Dent's discourse upon a journalistic tenor capable of galvanising public will for wholesale social reconstruction. The overlooked relationship between Eliot and Dent reveals a fascinating dialogue between late literary modernism and its wartime social corollary. Encompassing Eliot's writings in The Criterion, The Idea of a Christian Society, Notes towards the Definition of Culture, letters to the TES, papers delivered to the Christian Moot group, and Four Quartets, this article reveals the degree to which Dent's polemic negatively informed many of Eliot's educational pronouncements. </jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modernist Cultures Edinburgh University Press

T. S. E. and the TES : Eliot and Educationalism

Modernist Cultures , Volume 11 (2): 206 – Jul 1, 2016

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2016
Subject
Articles; Film, Media and Cultural Studies
ISSN
2041-1022
eISSN
1753-8629
DOI
10.3366/mod.2016.0135
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p> This article examines T. S. Eliot's response to the wartime discourse of educational reform articulated by the Times Educational Supplement and its editor H. C. Dent. Eliot attacked Dent over three main points: Dent's preference for the centralised direction of British culture via speculative models of ‘democratic’ education; the notion of popular mobilisation and its promotion by the Church; the reliance of Dent's discourse upon a journalistic tenor capable of galvanising public will for wholesale social reconstruction. The overlooked relationship between Eliot and Dent reveals a fascinating dialogue between late literary modernism and its wartime social corollary. Encompassing Eliot's writings in The Criterion, The Idea of a Christian Society, Notes towards the Definition of Culture, letters to the TES, papers delivered to the Christian Moot group, and Four Quartets, this article reveals the degree to which Dent's polemic negatively informed many of Eliot's educational pronouncements. </jats:p>

Journal

Modernist CulturesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jul 1, 2016

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