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Sub-State Protectionism in Ghana

Sub-State Protectionism in Ghana RECENT DEVELOPMENTS – ACTUALITÉS SUB-STATE PROTECTIONISM IN GHANA KOFI OTENG KUFUOR ∗ I. INTRODUCTION Knitted together from a number of administrative units during the colonial era, there has hardly been recorded concern about deliberately constructed tariff or nontariff barriers to the free movement of goods within what is modernday Ghana.1 The main trade-related concerns are the ability of exporters in Ghana to secure access to overseas markets, and also the need to provide local import-competing interests with shelter from supposedly unfair competition from overseas.2 However, a closer look at transactions within Ghana in what should be a unified market reveals protectionism of the type that supposedly exists only in international trade. Thus, the presumption that once imports into Ghana overcome any border tariff or nontariff barriers they circulate within the country free of any other permissible barriers is not quite correct. As we shall see in this paper, current trends in domestic political economy are such that through the interaction of judicial rulings, local government policy, and central government support, ∗ Professor of Law, University of East London and General Editor, African Journal of International and Comparative Law. 1 Ghana is the product of the Gold Coast Colony, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png African Journal of International and Comparative Law Edinburgh University Press

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2010
Subject
Recent Developments – Actualités; African Studies
ISSN
0954-8890
eISSN
1755-1609
DOI
10.3366/E0954889009000516
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS – ACTUALITÉS SUB-STATE PROTECTIONISM IN GHANA KOFI OTENG KUFUOR ∗ I. INTRODUCTION Knitted together from a number of administrative units during the colonial era, there has hardly been recorded concern about deliberately constructed tariff or nontariff barriers to the free movement of goods within what is modernday Ghana.1 The main trade-related concerns are the ability of exporters in Ghana to secure access to overseas markets, and also the need to provide local import-competing interests with shelter from supposedly unfair competition from overseas.2 However, a closer look at transactions within Ghana in what should be a unified market reveals protectionism of the type that supposedly exists only in international trade. Thus, the presumption that once imports into Ghana overcome any border tariff or nontariff barriers they circulate within the country free of any other permissible barriers is not quite correct. As we shall see in this paper, current trends in domestic political economy are such that through the interaction of judicial rulings, local government policy, and central government support, ∗ Professor of Law, University of East London and General Editor, African Journal of International and Comparative Law. 1 Ghana is the product of the Gold Coast Colony,

Journal

African Journal of International and Comparative LawEdinburgh University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2010

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