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Sport, Physical Culture, and New Materialisms: Part 2

Sport, Physical Culture, and New Materialisms: Part 2 GUEST EDITORS’ INTRODUCTION Sport, Physical Culture, and New Materialisms: Part 2 Joshua I. Newman and Holly Thorpe With the highly political and widely contested Tokyo Summer Olympic Games looming, we write at a time when sporting and moving bodies are once again at the forefront of global debate. Despite the majority of the Japanese population opposing the hosting of the Games as planned (see ‘Most Japanese oppose Tokyo Games this year-poll’ 2021) – and as the nation continues to struggle to cope with the wide-reaching health, economic, and social impacts of COVID-19 – the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the Tokyo Organizing Committee (TOC), and various other transnational stakeholders and corporate investors remain unwavering that the Games will go ahead. For some, the return of the familiar rhythms and regularity of such sporting events brings some sense of normality, but for others the hosting of body- assembling mega-events in a radically uncertain world evokes much fear and anxiety. Indeed, athletes around the world are being bumped to the front of vaccination cues. The young, healthy, strong bodies of athletes – with all their potential and capacity for nation-building performances and temporarily aspirational achievements – are being prioritised over the lives http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Somatechnics Edinburgh University Press

Sport, Physical Culture, and New Materialisms: Part 2

Somatechnics , Volume 11 (3): 5 – Dec 1, 2021

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2044-0138
eISSN
2044-0146
DOI
10.3366/soma.2021.0362
Publisher site
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Abstract

GUEST EDITORS’ INTRODUCTION Sport, Physical Culture, and New Materialisms: Part 2 Joshua I. Newman and Holly Thorpe With the highly political and widely contested Tokyo Summer Olympic Games looming, we write at a time when sporting and moving bodies are once again at the forefront of global debate. Despite the majority of the Japanese population opposing the hosting of the Games as planned (see ‘Most Japanese oppose Tokyo Games this year-poll’ 2021) – and as the nation continues to struggle to cope with the wide-reaching health, economic, and social impacts of COVID-19 – the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the Tokyo Organizing Committee (TOC), and various other transnational stakeholders and corporate investors remain unwavering that the Games will go ahead. For some, the return of the familiar rhythms and regularity of such sporting events brings some sense of normality, but for others the hosting of body- assembling mega-events in a radically uncertain world evokes much fear and anxiety. Indeed, athletes around the world are being bumped to the front of vaccination cues. The young, healthy, strong bodies of athletes – with all their potential and capacity for nation-building performances and temporarily aspirational achievements – are being prioritised over the lives

Journal

SomatechnicsEdinburgh University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2021

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