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Speculations on an architectural language: Charles Rennie Mackintosh's Architectural Drawings

Speculations on an architectural language: Charles Rennie Mackintosh's Architectural Drawings forms from nature were demonstrated by the inclusion of two watercolours: Harvest Moon of 1892 and Cabbages in an Orchard (1894). Another drawing, Roof of Napton Church (1897), exemplified Mackintosh’s life-long interest in historical and vernacular architecture and their ornamentation as a source for his vocabulary both as an architect and as an ornamentist.Arguably it was his skill as an innovative ornamentist and his translation of his decorative language, from the two dimensional medium of drawing into the three dimensional form of architecture, that helped to give his buildings their distinctive quality. The schemes produced by John Honeyman and Keppie during Mackintosh’s early association with the firm: the Canal Boatman’s Institute (1891); Queen Margaret College (1894–5); Martyr’s Public School (1895); and the Glasgow Herald (1896), contain Glasgow Style ornament as one element, mostly on door and window heads, in what are still lateVictorian Renaissance-derived designs. Mackintosh’s hand, guided by his study of mediaeval buildings, can also be detected in some of their structural elements, for example the timber roof trusses of the Martyr’s School and Queen Margaret College. Mackintosh’s interest in this historical structural form is evidenced in a small sketch which appears, almost as a footnote, on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

Speculations on an architectural language: Charles Rennie Mackintosh's Architectural Drawings

Architectural Heritage , Volume 18 (1): 175 – Nov 1, 2007

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2007.18.1.175
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

forms from nature were demonstrated by the inclusion of two watercolours: Harvest Moon of 1892 and Cabbages in an Orchard (1894). Another drawing, Roof of Napton Church (1897), exemplified Mackintosh’s life-long interest in historical and vernacular architecture and their ornamentation as a source for his vocabulary both as an architect and as an ornamentist.Arguably it was his skill as an innovative ornamentist and his translation of his decorative language, from the two dimensional medium of drawing into the three dimensional form of architecture, that helped to give his buildings their distinctive quality. The schemes produced by John Honeyman and Keppie during Mackintosh’s early association with the firm: the Canal Boatman’s Institute (1891); Queen Margaret College (1894–5); Martyr’s Public School (1895); and the Glasgow Herald (1896), contain Glasgow Style ornament as one element, mostly on door and window heads, in what are still lateVictorian Renaissance-derived designs. Mackintosh’s hand, guided by his study of mediaeval buildings, can also be detected in some of their structural elements, for example the timber roof trusses of the Martyr’s School and Queen Margaret College. Mackintosh’s interest in this historical structural form is evidenced in a small sketch which appears, almost as a footnote, on

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2007

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