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South-South Investment Treaties, Transnational Capital and African Peoples

South-South Investment Treaties, Transnational Capital and African Peoples IBIRONKE T. ODUMOSU-AYANU I. INTRODUCTION The flow of private capital is one of the major drivers of the global economy in the twenty-first century. African countries are active participants in the global regime that protects and regulates the flow of foreign direct investment (FDI), contributing to the regime mostly as recipients of capital, but sometimes as providers of this much-coveted capital.1 The legal aspects of this regime are being dominated by investment treaties, the North-South2 treaties being the most common. In recent years, investment treaties concluded among Third World3 countries ­ SouthSouth investment treaties4 ­ have proliferated, with African countries participating actively in the rapid conclusion of these treaties. This paper analyses the tripartite LLB (Hons) (Lagos), LLM (Calg.), PhD (UBC); Assistant Professor, College of Law, University of Saskatchewan. Thanks to the College of Law, University of Saskatchewan for providing research funds for this project and also to Jaclyn Hesje for research assistance. Early versions of this paper were presented at the Conference on Third World Approaches to International Law: Capitalism and the Common Good held in October 2011 at the University of Oregon and at the Conference on Africa and International Law held in April 2012 at http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png African Journal of International and Comparative Law Edinburgh University Press

South-South Investment Treaties, Transnational Capital and African Peoples

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press 2013
Subject
Articles; African Studies
ISSN
0954-8890
eISSN
1755-1609
DOI
10.3366/ajicl.2013.0058
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IBIRONKE T. ODUMOSU-AYANU I. INTRODUCTION The flow of private capital is one of the major drivers of the global economy in the twenty-first century. African countries are active participants in the global regime that protects and regulates the flow of foreign direct investment (FDI), contributing to the regime mostly as recipients of capital, but sometimes as providers of this much-coveted capital.1 The legal aspects of this regime are being dominated by investment treaties, the North-South2 treaties being the most common. In recent years, investment treaties concluded among Third World3 countries ­ SouthSouth investment treaties4 ­ have proliferated, with African countries participating actively in the rapid conclusion of these treaties. This paper analyses the tripartite LLB (Hons) (Lagos), LLM (Calg.), PhD (UBC); Assistant Professor, College of Law, University of Saskatchewan. Thanks to the College of Law, University of Saskatchewan for providing research funds for this project and also to Jaclyn Hesje for research assistance. Early versions of this paper were presented at the Conference on Third World Approaches to International Law: Capitalism and the Common Good held in October 2011 at the University of Oregon and at the Conference on Africa and International Law held in April 2012 at

Journal

African Journal of International and Comparative LawEdinburgh University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2013

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