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Searching for similarity using corpus-assisted discourse studies

Searching for similarity using corpus-assisted discourse studies <jats:p> It has often been noted that corpus-assisted discourse analysis is inherently comparative (e.g., Partington, 2009 ), but, in this paper, I want to emphasise that such comparison does not exclusively entail the analysis of difference and that the analysis of similarity can be productively incorporated into the framework. As Baker (2006 : 182) notes, the way that differences and similarities interact with each other is ‘an essential part of any comparative corpus-based study of discourse’. In this paper, first, I outline why the search for similarity is relevant to the analysis of discourse using corpus linguistics; I then go on to assess some possible ways of doing this; and, finally, I take the representation of boy/s and girl/s in British broadsheet newspapers as an example. </jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Corpora Edinburgh University Press

Searching for similarity using corpus-assisted discourse studies

Corpora , Volume 8 (1): 81 – May 1, 2013

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press
Subject
Linguistics
ISSN
1749-5032
eISSN
1755-1676
DOI
10.3366/cor.2013.0035
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p> It has often been noted that corpus-assisted discourse analysis is inherently comparative (e.g., Partington, 2009 ), but, in this paper, I want to emphasise that such comparison does not exclusively entail the analysis of difference and that the analysis of similarity can be productively incorporated into the framework. As Baker (2006 : 182) notes, the way that differences and similarities interact with each other is ‘an essential part of any comparative corpus-based study of discourse’. In this paper, first, I outline why the search for similarity is relevant to the analysis of discourse using corpus linguistics; I then go on to assess some possible ways of doing this; and, finally, I take the representation of boy/s and girl/s in British broadsheet newspapers as an example. </jats:p>

Journal

CorporaEdinburgh University Press

Published: May 1, 2013

There are no references for this article.